In order to minimize your risk of developing blood clots, you will be asked to stop taking birth control at least two weeks before surgery. You will also have to stop taking any hormones or supplements such as fish oil, and aspirin. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons requires that you sign a consent form confirming the cessation of all supplement intake. In addition to reducing your risk of developing blood clots, stopping your intake of supplements and other medications also helps to minimize bleeding during surgery.
During the procedure, you may experience sensations of pulling, tugging, mild pinching, intense cold, tingling, stinging, aching, and cramping at the treatment site. These sensations subside as the area becomes numb. Following the procedure, typical side effects include temporary redness, swelling, blanching, bruising, firmness, tingling, stinging, tenderness, cramping, aching, itching, or skin sensitivity, and sensation of fullness in the back of the throat after a submental area treatment. Rare side effects may also occur. The CoolSculpting® procedure is not for everyone. You should not have the CoolSculpting® procedure if you suffer from cryoglobulinemia, cold agglutinin disease, or paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. The CoolSculpting® procedure is not a treatment for obesity. Ask your doctor if CoolSculpting® is right for you. To learn more about what to expect, visit coolsculpting.com.
Chemical peels range in strength from light to medium to deep and generally price goes up as strength goes up. See a cosmetic physician and determine the following: extent of sun damage, severity of wrinkles, severity of scars, and the amount of downtime you can afford. After answering these questions the type of peel, number of treatments needed and post care regime can be determined. 
Year after year, Botox ranks as the number one minimally invasive cosmetic procedure, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (which represents Canada’s Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons). In 2009, 4.8 million Botox cosmetic procedures were done in the U.S. That’s down four per cent from 2008, but still ahead of hyaluronic acid dermal fillers (such as Juvéderm and Restylane, which showed a seven per cent upswing). Botox also topped non-surgical procedures globally in survey results released in August by the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.
Chemical peels rarely result in serious complications, but certain risks do exist. These risks include scarring, infection, swelling, changes in skin tone, and cold sore outbreaks. You can reduce the risks associated with facial peels by following all of the doctor’s instructions completely and by providing your doctor with a complete medical history.
Tell your doctor if you have received any other botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months; have received injections of botulinum toxin such as Myobloc®, Dysport®, or Xeomin® in the past (tell your doctor exactly which product you received); have recently received an antibiotic by injection; take muscle relaxants; take an allergy or cold medicine; take a sleep medicine; take aspirin-like products or blood thinners.

“Believe it or not, patients who are overweight are malnourished. What that means is that their capacity to heal is very poor,” says Grossman. “Patients who are malnourished have more seromas or fluid accumulations. In fact, about 50% of all patients will form a seroma when not stabilized nutritionally. So, at my practice we have an extensive approach to nutrition before and after the surgery.”


But if you try it and then decide to stop, what happens? “There’s this myth that if you stop using Botox, your face will look wrinkly and your features will cascade into a degenerative state you never had,” says Toronto cosmetic surgeon Dr. Stephen Mulholland, whose average Botox patient is age 40. But in fact, he says, if you stop, your face returns to its normal animation, and facial muscles return to normal strength. (Of course, you have aged slightly since you were injected, which may be apparent when it wears off.)
The average chemical peel can cost $500–$700 for each treatment, but prices range from $150 for a mild peel up to several thousand dollars for a series of deep peels. (10) While this might seem like a steep cost for good-looking skin, chemical peels are still less expensive than superficial fractional-laser treatments, which can run up to $1,000 a session and usually require multiple treatments.
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