During a medium chemical peel, your doctor will use a gauze, special sponge, or a cotton-tipped applicator to apply the chemical solution to your face. This may contain glycolic acid or trichloroacetic acid. A blue color may be added to the trichloroacetic acid, commonly known as a blue peel. The skin will begin to whiten, and your doctor will apply a cool compress to the skin. You may feel stinging or burning for up to 20 minutes. No neutralizing solution is needed, though they may give you a hand-held fan to cool your skin. If you’ve had the blue peel you will have a blue coloring of your skin that may last for several days after the peel.

“Unwanted side effects are hyper or hypopigmentation, swelling, or infection,” says Dr. Davin Lim, a Brisbane, Queensland dermatologist, in a RealSelf Q&A. “Expected side effects are redness, flaking, and dryness, and can be easily managed. You can manage these risks by doing the following: sun protection, prepping your skin before chemical peels, avoiding active ingredients one to two days before treatment, and consulting with an experienced cosmetic provider and following aftercare instructions.”

“The safety and efficacy of any chemical peel are dependent upon preparation, depth, post care, and the experience of the clinician administering the peel,” says Dr. Larry C. Leverett, a Phoenix plastic surgeon, in a chemical peel Q&A. “When treating African-American skin and other ethnic skin types, prepping the skin for a chemical peel is a necessity. … Our patients must prep for at least four weeks prior to the peel, are educated extensively on how to care for their skin post peel, and are encouraged to adhere to their prescribed skin care regimen to obtain optimal results.”
Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including: plans to have surgery; had surgery on your face; have trouble raising your eyebrows; drooping eyelids; any other abnormal facial change; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic can harm your unborn baby); are breast-feeding or plan to (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic passes into breast milk).
Deep chemical peels involve a longer procedure and longer recovery time that lasts up to several months in some cases. Patients who want to correct blotches caused by sun exposure or age, minimize coarse wrinkles, or remove a pre-cancerous growth may benefit from a deep peel. There are certain factors which must be taken into consideration when contemplating a deep chemical peel. Darker-skinned patients and individuals with heart problems are not ideal candidates. Potential chemical peel candidates should be aware that the treatment may take an hour or more, and may require sedation. Anyone who decides on this procedure should be prepared for a long, slow recovery period, and should wear sunscreen whenever exposed to sun.
Deep chemical peels are the strongest of the facial peels. The chemical used for deep chemical peels is phenol acid. Deep peels are used to treat coarse facial wrinkles, blotches caused by aging or sun exposure, and pre-cancerous growths. While a deep chemical peel produces the most dramatic, longest-lasting results, the procedure takes longer than other peels (one to two hours) and requires the most healing time. Phenol acid is typically used only for facial peels. Because a deep chemical peel may cause permanent lightening of the skin, prospective patients should seek advice from a qualified cosmetic dermatologist before undergoing the procedure.

A superficial peel, which will be the mildest peel available is often referred to as a lunchtime peel since it can be done in less than 30 minutes.  Using either an alpha-hydroxy acid or another type of mild acid, such as salicylic or maleic acid, this treatment will be lightly applied to the targeted area to exfoliate it.  A light peel will often need multiple treatments to see desirable results.
One investigation from 2003 tried to decide if Botox infusions under and around the eyes could diminish the presence of wrinkles in these regions. Nineteen female members gotten infusions. The individuals who had them in the lower eyelids and crow’s feet territory will probably report positive outcomes than the individuals who just gotten infusions in their lower eyelids.
Deep peels must be performed by a medical doctor and can take 14 to 21 days to heal. Deep peels require special aftercare including antiviral medication, ointments and follow-up visits, according to the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. The chemical solution used for deep peels may be phenol or trichloroacetic acid, which both reach far into the middle layer of your skin and remove damaged skin cells. Phenol chemical peels may require sedation and should only be done on the face, as the skin on the hands and neck is too thin. The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery explains this procedure may only be performed one time on a patient and is not recommended for people with darker skin or freckles, as it can cause hypopigmentation. Deep peels may cost anywhere from $3,500-$5,000—not including the doctor’s fees.
Dr. Benchetrit uses techniques and technologies that produce minimal scarring and require little downtime. He is also one of a small group of surgeons in Canada to own the Vectra 3D photography system, which allows his patients to “preview” their results before making any decisions about surgery. Dr. Benchetrit closely consults with every surgical candidate to explore all available options and recommend a treatment plan suited to the person’s individual needs and goals.
They come in a range of strengths, from deeper phenol-based peels to more superficial peels like glycolic acid. Deeper peels may not be right for everyone, particularly if you have sensitive skin. A few light or medium-depth peels can often achieve similar results to one deeper peel treatment, with less risk and a shorter recovery time. Talk to a qualified provider about your goals to see if a chemical peel would work for your concern and skin.
The benefits and drawbacks of laser skin resurfacing vs. chemical peels are slightly more difficult to ascertain, due to the relatively new nature of the laser resurfacing procedure. However, many doctors claim that the improvement to patients' skin after laser skin resurfacing is essentially equivalent to that seen with chemical peels and microdermabrasion. Lasers do allow doctors to target specific flaws and imperfections with much more precision than chemical peels.
A ventral hernia occurs when part of the intestines push through a tear in the abdominal wall. These tears are sometimes the result of an incision made during a prior surgery. Either of these conditions can inhibit blood flow, which can in turn complicate the healing process. During a patient's initial consultation, I conduct my own physical analysis of the patient and a review of his or her medical history to determine if either of these conditions are present.
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