During a pre-op consultation, you should be prepared to discuss your medication and supplement regimen in great detail. You should also be prepared to talk about your own medical history. Both of these aspects have to be reviewed in order to assess your risk of developing potentially dangerous blood clots and bleeding excessively during surgery. If you use tobacco, you must also understand that you will be expected to stop nicotine intake of all kinds at least three months prior to surgery, and continue to abstain during recovery.
Deep peels must be performed by a medical doctor and can take 14 to 21 days to heal. Deep peels require special aftercare including antiviral medication, ointments and follow-up visits, according to the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. The chemical solution used for deep peels may be phenol or trichloroacetic acid, which both reach far into the middle layer of your skin and remove damaged skin cells. Phenol chemical peels may require sedation and should only be done on the face, as the skin on the hands and neck is too thin. The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery explains this procedure may only be performed one time on a patient and is not recommended for people with darker skin or freckles, as it can cause hypopigmentation. Deep peels may cost anywhere from $3,500-$5,000—not including the doctor’s fees.

A tummy tuck almost always involves the removal of excess skin, fat, and other tissue, along with the tightening of the underlying abdominal muscles. It requires both internal and external healing. Therefore, it is especially important for your surgeon to make certain that any risk of excessive bleeding and other complications during surgery is minimized.
The average chemical peel can cost $500–$700 for each treatment, but prices range from $150 for a mild peel up to several thousand dollars for a series of deep peels. (10) While this might seem like a steep cost for good-looking skin, chemical peels are still less expensive than superficial fractional-laser treatments, which can run up to $1,000 a session and usually require multiple treatments.
Medium-depth peels — Helps to remove facial lines, scars and birthmarks, but can cause side effects and take longer to heal from. Most people will see at least some results after one treatment, but multiple treatments are usually needed for full effects. Some dermatologists now recommend mild to medium peels that use multiple acids rather than one single acid at a higher strength, as multiple acids can lead to less irritation.
“Potential things that could go wrong include skin infections, wound healing problems, seroma formation, hematoma formation, muscle plication suture failure, ‘dog ears’ or extra tissue on either side of the incision along the hips, blood clots, and uneven or unsightly scars,” says plastic and reconstructive surgeon Dr. Megan Jack from Boca Raton, FL.

The use of Chemical peels is usually seen on the face, the neck, and the hands mostly. These are the areas normally exposed to the sun as well. The Peels once applied may form blisters on the surface, but will peel off automatically. As the name itself suggests, it is made of certain chemicals and there are different types people can find and use, depending on the purpose of the application. There is the short duration and instant type peels the trade would call lunchtime peels and there are also the deeper ones which will work deeper into the skin follicles and produce longer lasting results. The exact chemical used in these types will also vary accordingly. The Chemical Peels are chosen based on the need for a mild or a strong action on the skin.
After being applied to the skin, chemical peels intentionally make the skin blister and then peel, although chemical peels are now considered safer than in years past and are less likely to leave skin feeling “raw.” (3) The purpose of peels is to remove dull surface skin cells, which typically leads to an improvement in fine lines, acne, discoloration and more.
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