The Romans also performed plastic cosmetic surgery. The Romans were able to perform simple techniques, such as repairing damaged ears, from around the 1st century BC. For religious reasons, they did not dissect either human beings or animals, thus their knowledge was based in its entirety on the texts of their Greek predecessors. Notwithstanding, Aulus Cornelius Celsus left some surprisingly accurate anatomical descriptions,[15] some of which — for instance, his studies on the genitalia and the skeleton — are of special interest to plastic surgery.[16]
Our before and after technology and camera room is set up to produce high definition, full screen sized comparisons that are perfectly aligned – even though many images are taken many months apart. The time and consideration taken in our before and after gallery is a testament to Dr. Oakley’s creative drive and passion for excellence, and user experience.
Umbilical and ventral hernias are conditions that must be addressed prior to undergoing abdominoplasty. An umbilical hernia occurs when a portion of the small intestine protrudes through a natural opening between the abdominal muscles. Though the condition is fairly common and usually does not create any painful or debilitating symptoms, it can complicate abdominoplasty.
Gaining an understanding of the entire abdominoplasty process from pre-operative planning to full recovery can play an important role in the success of the surgery. This knowledge can help you feel confident in your decision to undergo body contouring, and help you play an active role in achieving the best possible results and the longest-term satisfaction with your refined midsection.
Additionally, recent studies have found that certain chemical peels can help reverse melasma, a type of hyperpigmentary disorder and “notorious dermatosis” that is often resistant to treatments, including laser treatments. (8) Melasma is a common chronic form of hyperpigmentation of the skin that can have a serious impact on someone’s self-esteem and quality of life.
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