This wonderful client wanted to look less tired and angry. She was treated with a full face rejuvenation technique, called Soft Lift, in one session. The Soft Lift combines the use of Botox and Juvederm filler to give her an overall refreshed and happier appearance. The 2nd photo was taken 1 week after her treatment to show that filler looks better with time. The 3rd photo was taken 1 month after the treatment. She loves her more fresher, youthful look!
After relaying to Nurse Libbie that I didn’t want it to look ‘too frozen’, she agrees to give me 10 units across my forehead, and 15 in the centre of my frown- the average dose is between 10-25 units. I lay down across the bed in her treatment room and as she preps the solution, I’m asked to frown and raise my brows. As I do so she inserts the needle, and a tiny dose of botox by Allergen is inserted across six points of my forehead and in between my eyebrows.

Both standard and extended abdominoplasty often require that I place drainage tubes that help prevent the buildup of blood and fluid at the incision site. I will usually remove the first of these tubes after about three days, and the remainder are removed a few days later. I always provide a special support garment that can further prevent the buildup of fluid.
Some people with a particular type of skin can face issues immediately after taking a Chemical Peels treatment for their skin. Some of them can even see some swelling and breaking of the skin surface that can take a few days to recover fully. Similarly, there are instances of alteration in the colour of the skin after the peel withers off. There have also been reports of scarring on the skin surface following a Chemical Peels treatment. It must, however, be added here that almost all these after effects are of temporary nature and they are generally treated and rectified without causing any permanent damage.
Medium-depth peels — Helps to remove facial lines, scars and birthmarks, but can cause side effects and take longer to heal from. Most people will see at least some results after one treatment, but multiple treatments are usually needed for full effects. Some dermatologists now recommend mild to medium peels that use multiple acids rather than one single acid at a higher strength, as multiple acids can lead to less irritation. 

Before the procedure even begins, the professional who’s going to perform the procedure will first apply a chemical solution — usually trichloroacetic acid, glycolic acid, trichloroacetic acid, salicylic acid, lactic acid or carbolic acid (phenol) on small areas of your skin.  Doing so can create a controlled wound, allowing the new skin to take its place.

Post treatment I was a left a little red and blotchy, so I cancelled any meetings I had straight after. Although the redness soon faded I was left with a few tiny pin prick points. I am told that bruising is common, but it all depends on how sensitive your skin is. I was also left with a slight headache, almost like I’d been wearing a swim cap for a few days. This too didn’t last longer than a few hours, and wasn’t anything that two paracetamol couldn’t fix. If you do experience a headache for longer than 48 hours, or any other symptoms like nausea or visual disturbances (although rare) you are advised to contact your practitioner.
The use of Chemical peels is usually seen on the face, the neck, and the hands mostly. These are the areas normally exposed to the sun as well. The Peels once applied may form blisters on the surface, but will peel off automatically. As the name itself suggests, it is made of certain chemicals and there are different types people can find and use, depending on the purpose of the application. There is the short duration and instant type peels the trade would call lunchtime peels and there are also the deeper ones which will work deeper into the skin follicles and produce longer lasting results. The exact chemical used in these types will also vary accordingly. The Chemical Peels are chosen based on the need for a mild or a strong action on the skin.
Your cosmetic dermatologist will use a specific formula for your chemical peel based on the characteristics of your skin and your desired result. Light chemical peels are used to treat fine wrinkling, areas of dryness, uneven pigmentation, and acne. The solution used for light chemical peels is usually comprised of alphahydroxy acids (AHAs), such as glycolic, lactic, salicylic, or fruit acids. Light chemical peels are ideal for people who want the benefits of a facial peel but do not wish to spend the time required to recover from a deeper peel.

Some doctors don’t believe wearing a binder is necessary, but others may recommend wearing one for up to six weeks. Doctors who choose to use binders place their patients in one right after surgery. You’ll wear it 24 hours a day for the first week, changing to less compression and fewer hours over the next few weeks. Follow your surgeon’s recommendation.
When performed by an experienced cosmetic dermatologist or plastic surgeon, chemical facial peels are safe. With light and medium peels, relatively mild chemical peel side effects such as redness, stinging, and crusting usually subside within a day or two after the treatment. The side effects of deep chemical peels are typically more pronounced, and recovery time is longer. More serious side effects, such as infection and scarring, are possible, especially with medium and deep chemical peels. However, serious side effects are rare when the procedure is performed by a qualified doctor.
There sure are. Peels are formulated as light, medium, or deep chemical treatments, based on the chemicals used and how they are formulated. The treatment that's right for you will depend on what you're hoping to treat and how much downtime you're willing to endure. You should always consult with your dermatologist before undergoing any chemical peel.
Treatments for the plastic repair of a broken nose are first mentioned in the Edwin Smith Papyrus,[7] a transcription of an Ancient Egyptian medical text, one of the oldest known surgical treatises, dated to the Old Kingdom from 3000 to 2500 BC.[8] Reconstructive surgery techniques were being carried out in India by 800 BC.[9] Sushruta was a physician who made important contributions to the field of plastic and cataract surgery in 6th century BC.[10] The medical works of both Sushruta and Charaka, originally in Sanskrit, were translated into the Arabic language during the Abbasid Caliphate in 750 AD.[11] The Arabic translations made their way into Europe via intermediaries.[11] In Italy, the Branca family[12] of Sicily and Gaspare Tagliacozzi (Bologna) became familiar with the techniques of Sushruta.[11]
Lee agrees, saying, “I highly recommended you have someone to stay with you for at least 24 to 48 hours after your procedure. You won’t be able to stand straight for a time after your tummy tuck so you will need some help doing simple tasks like getting out of bed, removing garments and showering. Although you may not feel like getting out of bed, you’ll be encouraged to get up at least two to three times a day and move around, as this helps increase circulation.”

The average chemical peel can cost $500–$700 for each treatment, but prices range from $150 for a mild peel up to several thousand dollars for a series of deep peels. (10) While this might seem like a steep cost for good-looking skin, chemical peels are still less expensive than superficial fractional-laser treatments, which can run up to $1,000 a session and usually require multiple treatments.
“There are many different types and depths [of peels], and they address different skin concerns and conditions,” says Dr. Neel Bector, a Mississauga, Ontario physician, in a chemical peel recovery Q&A. “A great peel with minimal downtime is a Jessner—it works well for pore size, scarring, and hyperpigmentation. You can expect some light peeling lasting approximately three days.”
For example, you can make a homemade anti-aging serum— using jojoba oil, pomegranate seed oil, rosehip oil, and essential oils like lavender or frankincense — that richly hydrates your skin as well as provides antioxidant protection. Products that contain antioxidants and vitamins for your skin — like vitamins E, A and C —are also great for reducing sun damage and improving the appearance of skin.
If you’re interested, talk to your physician about getting a referral. (If I were to go for it, I’d also do my own research, maybe asking a friend who’d had a positive experience — and whose results I could see — for the name of her doctor.) Then check with your provincial college of physicians for disciplinary issues, the Canadian Medical Protective Association for malpractice issues and RateMDs.com to see what other patients say about specific doctors. Ask for Botox before and after photos, and get a sense of how long the doctor has been administering Botox. (Are are a few other questions to ask your doctor before taking the plunge.)

A study published in 2009 in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology found that Botox may also improve a person’s mood. The theory there? The less you scowl — a facial expression that’s not easy to make with a smoothed brow — the more upbeat you feel. People who like it (some of my friends included) say it’s simply one item on the menu of ways to stay youthful looking, especially in a competitive workforce.
Tell your doctor if you have received any other botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months; have received injections of botulinum toxin such as Myobloc®, Dysport®, or Xeomin® in the past (tell your doctor exactly which product you received); have recently received an antibiotic by injection; take muscle relaxants; take an allergy or cold medicine; take a sleep medicine; take aspirin-like products or blood thinners.
During the procedure, you may experience sensations of pulling, tugging, mild pinching, intense cold, tingling, stinging, aching, and cramping at the treatment site. These sensations subside as the area becomes numb. Following the procedure, typical side effects include temporary redness, swelling, blanching, bruising, firmness, tingling, stinging, tenderness, cramping, aching, itching, or skin sensitivity, and sensation of fullness in the back of the throat after a submental area treatment. Rare side effects may also occur. The CoolSculpting® procedure is not for everyone. You should not have the CoolSculpting® procedure if you suffer from cryoglobulinemia, cold agglutinin disease, or paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. The CoolSculpting® procedure is not a treatment for obesity. Ask your doctor if CoolSculpting® is right for you. To learn more about what to expect, visit coolsculpting.com. 

For me, the main area of concern is my forehead, which I’m told by all the greatest in injectables, to be the most common for those under thirty. After too many holiday sunburns, and recognising that I speak with very expressive eyebrows, the fine faint lines horizontally across my forehead have become much more prominent. So, in the name of beauty journalism I decided to give botox a try, here's what I learnt...
Your skin is where your beauty routine starts, and even if you don’t wear makeup you can help your face have a natural glow. A chemical peel gives you a chance to remove the damaged top layers of your skin and reveal healthier new skin underneath. When you get a chemical peel, a solution is applied to the areas you want to rejuvenate on your face, neck, or hands.
I needed very little convincing before making my way down to the Cadogan Clinic, one of the very best locations in London (might I add) to speak to Nurse Libbie Wallace, a master in her field. After filling in a short consultation form, Nurse Libbie asks me how old I am. After replying 28, she chuckles a little, but continues… I’m not the youngest client she’s had walk through the door, but she does tell me that she would only ever treat those that actually can benefit from the treatment, ‘It’s important that I manage patients expectations’.
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