When performed by an experienced cosmetic dermatologist or plastic surgeon, chemical facial peels are safe. With light and medium peels, relatively mild chemical peel side effects such as redness, stinging, and crusting usually subside within a day or two after the treatment. The side effects of deep chemical peels are typically more pronounced, and recovery time is longer. More serious side effects, such as infection and scarring, are possible, especially with medium and deep chemical peels. However, serious side effects are rare when the procedure is performed by a qualified doctor.

Your risk of developing a dangerous blood clot may be higher if you have previously had deep vein thrombosis, or the formation of a blood clot in your leg. If you have had cancer, or if you have a family history of cancer, this must also be considered. Another part of assessing your risk of thrombosis involves a test called the Caprini Risk Assessment Model. It takes note of factors such as your age and any recent injuries or surgeries. A point system indicates whether it is safe to proceed with abdominoplasty, or if any special measures should be taken to ensure your safety during surgery.


Chemical peels range in strength from light to medium to deep and generally price goes up as strength goes up. See a cosmetic physician and determine the following: extent of sun damage, severity of wrinkles, severity of scars, and the amount of downtime you can afford. After answering these questions the type of peel, number of treatments needed and post care regime can be determined. 
All chemical peels remove outer layers of the skin, though how many layers depends on the intensity of the peel. After a healing period, which also varies with the intensity level, skin is left feeling softer and smoother. Superficial issues such as acne or acne scars, fine lines and wrinkles, and hyperpigmentation should be improved, if not completely corrected. And because chemical peels sweep away complexion-dulling dead skin cells, they leave faces with a radiant glow.
Medium-depth peels — Helps to remove facial lines, scars and birthmarks, but can cause side effects and take longer to heal from. Most people will see at least some results after one treatment, but multiple treatments are usually needed for full effects. Some dermatologists now recommend mild to medium peels that use multiple acids rather than one single acid at a higher strength, as multiple acids can lead to less irritation.
Your cosmetic dermatologist will use a specific formula for your chemical peel based on the characteristics of your skin and your desired result. Light chemical peels are used to treat fine wrinkling, areas of dryness, uneven pigmentation, and acne. The solution used for light chemical peels is usually comprised of alphahydroxy acids (AHAs), such as glycolic, lactic, salicylic, or fruit acids. Light chemical peels are ideal for people who want the benefits of a facial peel but do not wish to spend the time required to recover from a deeper peel. 

Before the procedure even begins, the professional who’s going to perform the procedure will first apply a chemical solution — usually trichloroacetic acid, glycolic acid, trichloroacetic acid, salicylic acid, lactic acid or carbolic acid (phenol) on small areas of your skin.  Doing so can create a controlled wound, allowing the new skin to take its place.

Before the procedure even begins, the professional who’s going to perform the procedure will first apply a chemical solution — usually trichloroacetic acid, glycolic acid, trichloroacetic acid, salicylic acid, lactic acid or carbolic acid (phenol) on small areas of your skin.  Doing so can create a controlled wound, allowing the new skin to take its place.
The chemical solution for body chemical peels is typically comprised of a combination of trichloroacetic acid (the main ingredient in a medium-depth skin peel) and glycolic acid (the main ingredient of a mild peel). The solution for body chemical peels is typically formulated to be slightly stronger than the chemical solution used for light or medium facial skin peels, though it is milder than the phenol solution used for deep skin peels.
“There are many different types and depths [of peels], and they address different skin concerns and conditions,” says Dr. Neel Bector, a Mississauga, Ontario physician, in a chemical peel recovery Q&A. “A great peel with minimal downtime is a Jessner—it works well for pore size, scarring, and hyperpigmentation. You can expect some light peeling lasting approximately three days.”

The current semantic diversity of the word plastic has a long history of development. Essentially, there are two ways of using this term.[5] In its original sense plastic relates to formation or shaping of matter, i.e. to plastic art. Plastic can also be used figuratively in the meaning of formation of non-material things (e.g. writing a poem, creating a piece of music, and so on), i.e. in the meaning of the power to create. Both notions have been around for thousands of years. The origin of the dual history of the materialistic and philosophical use of plastic can be traced back to the ancient Greek craft of pottery and mythology, respectively. Wider textual use of the term plastic began with Pliny the Elder’s (23 – 79 AD) Plastice, a chapter in his Natural History. The semantic flourish of plastic started only at the end of the 18th century when Johann Gottfried Herder introduced the concept of “plastic sense” in his aesthetic essay Plastik (Sculpture) of 1778.[5]


Chemical peels are cosmetic treatments that can be applied to the face, hands, and neck. They’re used to improve the appearance or feel of the skin. During this procedure, chemical solutions will be applied to the area being treated, which causes the skin to exfoliate and eventually peel off. Once this happens, the new skin underneath is often smoother, appears less wrinkled, and may have less damage.
Additionally, recent studies have found that certain chemical peels can help reverse melasma, a type of hyperpigmentary disorder and “notorious dermatosis” that is often resistant to treatments, including laser treatments. (8) Melasma is a common chronic form of hyperpigmentation of the skin that can have a serious impact on someone’s self-esteem and quality of life.
But if you try it and then decide to stop, what happens? “There’s this myth that if you stop using Botox, your face will look wrinkly and your features will cascade into a degenerative state you never had,” says Toronto cosmetic surgeon Dr. Stephen Mulholland, whose average Botox patient is age 40. But in fact, he says, if you stop, your face returns to its normal animation, and facial muscles return to normal strength. (Of course, you have aged slightly since you were injected, which may be apparent when it wears off.)

This lovely patient is under 30 years of age. She was treated with Botox and Juvederm Filler for a fresher, less tired look with a full face rejuvenation technique called Soft Lift. The loss of volume under her eyes (tear troughs) that caused her to look tired was treated with Juvederm filler. To continue to soften her look, the lines around her mouth were treated with Filler, as well as a small amount of Juvederm in her lips to give her a youthful fresh look.

A ventral hernia occurs when part of the intestines push through a tear in the abdominal wall. These tears are sometimes the result of an incision made during a prior surgery. Either of these conditions can inhibit blood flow, which can in turn complicate the healing process. During a patient's initial consultation, I conduct my own physical analysis of the patient and a review of his or her medical history to determine if either of these conditions are present.
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