Applying Chemical Peels is a treatment done to make the skin’s appearance better, smoother and softer. Where the skin is constantly exposed to direct sunlight and becomes dry or if wrinkles start forming due to normal ageing process also Chemical Peels can be applied and the skin restored to a much better condition. Some persons also use the Chemical Peels to treat specific conditions like acne or scars on the skin. While acne can be treated, the scars may not disappear completely, but there will definitely be an improvement in the skin quality and the difference will show.
Tell your doctor if you have received any other botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months; have received injections of botulinum toxin such as Myobloc®, Dysport®, or Xeomin® in the past (tell your doctor exactly which product you received); have recently received an antibiotic by injection; take muscle relaxants; take an allergy or cold medicine; take a sleep medicine; take aspirin-like products or blood thinners.
Your doctor may numb the area with a topical anesthetic, especially if you’re receiving a deep peel. For deep peels, your doctor may also use a regional anesthetic, which will numb large areas. They are particularly likely to do this if you’re having your face and neck treated. For deep peels, you’ll also be given an IV, and your heart rate will be closely monitored.
Most SkinMedica® products are intended to meet the FDA’s definition of a cosmetic product, an article applied to the human body to cleanse, beautify, promote attractiveness, and alter appearances. These SkinMedica® products are not intended to be drug products that diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or condition. These products have not been approved by the FDA, and the statements have not been evaluated by the FDA.
“The safety and efficacy of any chemical peel are dependent upon preparation, depth, post care, and the experience of the clinician administering the peel,” says Dr. Larry C. Leverett, a Phoenix plastic surgeon, in a chemical peel Q&A. “When treating African-American skin and other ethnic skin types, prepping the skin for a chemical peel is a necessity. … Our patients must prep for at least four weeks prior to the peel, are educated extensively on how to care for their skin post peel, and are encouraged to adhere to their prescribed skin care regimen to obtain optimal results.”

During a pre-op consultation, you should be prepared to discuss your medication and supplement regimen in great detail. You should also be prepared to talk about your own medical history. Both of these aspects have to be reviewed in order to assess your risk of developing potentially dangerous blood clots and bleeding excessively during surgery. If you use tobacco, you must also understand that you will be expected to stop nicotine intake of all kinds at least three months prior to surgery, and continue to abstain during recovery.

After relaying to Nurse Libbie that I didn’t want it to look ‘too frozen’, she agrees to give me 10 units across my forehead, and 15 in the centre of my frown- the average dose is between 10-25 units. I lay down across the bed in her treatment room and as she preps the solution, I’m asked to frown and raise my brows. As I do so she inserts the needle, and a tiny dose of botox by Allergen is inserted across six points of my forehead and in between my eyebrows. 

Additionally, recent studies have found that certain chemical peels can help reverse melasma, a type of hyperpigmentary disorder and “notorious dermatosis” that is often resistant to treatments, including laser treatments. (8) Melasma is a common chronic form of hyperpigmentation of the skin that can have a serious impact on someone’s self-esteem and quality of life.
×