You should expect to visit your surgeon the day after surgery to fully assess your condition. During this appointment, I usually fit the patient with their support garment, which will help to prevent the formation of blood clots. After the first follow-up, I schedule weekly visits. These continue depending upon the patient's extent of treatment, as well as his or her risk factors in developing blood clots and other complications.
When performed by an experienced cosmetic dermatologist or plastic surgeon, chemical facial peels are safe. With light and medium peels, relatively mild chemical peel side effects such as redness, stinging, and crusting usually subside within a day or two after the treatment. The side effects of deep chemical peels are typically more pronounced, and recovery time is longer. More serious side effects, such as infection and scarring, are possible, especially with medium and deep chemical peels. However, serious side effects are rare when the procedure is performed by a qualified doctor.
During the pre-op assessment, you can expect your surgeon to conduct a close evaluation of your risk of thrombosis, or the formation of blood clots inside blood vessels. Blood clotting is a natural process that is essential in healing. For example, when you experience a minor cut on your skin, the scab that forms is a result of blood clotting. In most cases, blood clots dissolve on their own. However, when a blood clot inside a blood vessel fails to dissolve, it can obstruct proper blood flow to the lungs, brain, and other areas, which can cause serious health complications.
Keep in mind that after a chemical peel, your skin will temporarily be more sensitive to the sun and any products you apply. Be sure to wear sunscreen (ideally one that’s broad spectrum and above SPF 30) and consider limiting the time you spend directly in the sun for several weeks. To protect your skin from irritation, also talk to your dermatologist before a peel about whether you should stop using certain types of products or medications — including those used to treat cold sores, Retin-A, Renova, glycolic acid or some antibiotics.

If you’re interested, talk to your physician about getting a referral. (If I were to go for it, I’d also do my own research, maybe asking a friend who’d had a positive experience — and whose results I could see — for the name of her doctor.) Then check with your provincial college of physicians for disciplinary issues, the Canadian Medical Protective Association for malpractice issues and RateMDs.com to see what other patients say about specific doctors. Ask for Botox before and after photos, and get a sense of how long the doctor has been administering Botox. (Are are a few other questions to ask your doctor before taking the plunge.)
In the term "plastic surgery," the adjective plastic implies sculpting and/or reshaping, which is derived from the Greek πλαστική (τέχνη), plastikē (tekhnē), "the art of modelling" of malleable flesh.[2] This meaning in English is seen as early as 1598.[3] The surgical definition of "plastic" first appeared in 1839, preceding the modern "engineering material made from petroleum" sense of plastic (coined by Leo Baekeland in 1909) by 70 years.[4]
“Believe it or not, patients who are overweight are malnourished. What that means is that their capacity to heal is very poor,” says Grossman. “Patients who are malnourished have more seromas or fluid accumulations. In fact, about 50% of all patients will form a seroma when not stabilized nutritionally. So, at my practice we have an extensive approach to nutrition before and after the surgery.”

“Ensure that you take adequate time off from work,” says Taglienti. “For most people, this means two weeks. Granted, everyone heals differently, but if you take a full two weeks to rest after surgery, you will not feel as sore and tired when you return to work. Patients who do not give themselves a chance to heal properly can cause needless tension on the wound, and impede wound healing.”


After a chemical peel, skin is temporarily more sensitive to the sun, so wear sunscreen every day. It should say "broad-spectrum" on the label, meaning it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB rays. Also, it should be a physical sunscreen and be above SPF 30. Limit your time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and wear a wide-brimmed hat.
You should expect to visit your surgeon the day after surgery to fully assess your condition. During this appointment, I usually fit the patient with their support garment, which will help to prevent the formation of blood clots. After the first follow-up, I schedule weekly visits. These continue depending upon the patient's extent of treatment, as well as his or her risk factors in developing blood clots and other complications.
After the procedure is done, the skin will look as though it has been sunburned, and for about a week after the procedure has been done, the skin will start to peel, exposing the skin underneath.  It can be a few weeks before the skin heals properly.  Medium-depth peels, however, may result in swelling or blisters that crust or break down over time and can take a longer time to heal.
Some people with a particular type of skin can face issues immediately after taking a Chemical Peels treatment for their skin. Some of them can even see some swelling and breaking of the skin surface that can take a few days to recover fully. Similarly, there are instances of alteration in the colour of the skin after the peel withers off. There have also been reports of scarring on the skin surface following a Chemical Peels treatment. It must, however, be added here that almost all these after effects are of temporary nature and they are generally treated and rectified without causing any permanent damage. 

During World War I he worked as a medical minder with the Royal Army Medical Corps. After working with the renowned French oral and maxillofacial surgeon Hippolyte Morestin on skin graft, he persuaded the army's chief surgeon, Arbuthnot-Lane, to establish a facial injury ward at the Cambridge Military Hospital, Aldershot, later upgraded to a new hospital for facial repairs at Sidcup in 1917. There Gillies and his colleagues developed many techniques of plastic surgery; more than 11,000 operations were performed on more than 5,000 men (mostly soldiers with facial injuries, usually from gunshot wounds).[citation needed]After the war, Gillies developed a private practice with Rainsford Mowlem, including many famous patients, and travelled extensively to promote his advanced techniques worldwide.
Clinical diagnosis of depression or other mental health disorders, including body dysmorphic disorder and eating disorders. Please discuss any history of mental health disorders with your surgeon prior to surgery. Patients with a diagnosis of depression or other mental health disorders should wait for resolution or stabilization of these conditions prior to undergoing breast implantation surgery.
Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including: plans to have surgery; had surgery on your face; have trouble raising your eyebrows; drooping eyelids; any other abnormal facial change; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic can harm your unborn baby); are breast-feeding or plan to (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic passes into breast milk).
Before receiving KYBELLA®, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you: Have had or plan to have surgery on your face, neck, or chin; have had cosmetic treatments on your face, neck, or chin; have had or have medical conditions in or near the neck area; have had or have trouble swallowing; have bleeding problems; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if KYBELLA® will harm your unborn baby); are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed (it is not known if KYBELLA® passes into your breast milk).
I needed very little convincing before making my way down to the Cadogan Clinic, one of the very best locations in London (might I add) to speak to Nurse Libbie Wallace, a master in her field. After filling in a short consultation form, Nurse Libbie asks me how old I am. After replying 28, she chuckles a little, but continues… I’m not the youngest client she’s had walk through the door, but she does tell me that she would only ever treat those that actually can benefit from the treatment, ‘It’s important that I manage patients expectations’.
×