A superficial peel, which will be the mildest peel available is often referred to as a lunchtime peel since it can be done in less than 30 minutes.  Using either an alpha-hydroxy acid or another type of mild acid, such as salicylic or maleic acid, this treatment will be lightly applied to the targeted area to exfoliate it.  A light peel will often need multiple treatments to see desirable results.
In the term "plastic surgery," the adjective plastic implies sculpting and/or reshaping, which is derived from the Greek πλαστική (τέχνη), plastikē (tekhnē), "the art of modelling" of malleable flesh.[2] This meaning in English is seen as early as 1598.[3] The surgical definition of "plastic" first appeared in 1839, preceding the modern "engineering material made from petroleum" sense of plastic (coined by Leo Baekeland in 1909) by 70 years.[4]
Yes, all chemical peels require some downtime. Light flaking, irritation, and peeling usually occur for a few days after light peels. It can take up to six weeks for skin to return to its normal appearance following a medium chemical peel. Deep chemical peels are closer in nature to a surgical treatment—patients are usually asked to rest their skin for two weeks before they're able to resume normal activities or wear makeup. Skin may remain red in appearance for up to three months.

Some people with a particular type of skin can face issues immediately after taking a Chemical Peels treatment for their skin. Some of them can even see some swelling and breaking of the skin surface that can take a few days to recover fully. Similarly, there are instances of alteration in the colour of the skin after the peel withers off. There have also been reports of scarring on the skin surface following a Chemical Peels treatment. It must, however, be added here that almost all these after effects are of temporary nature and they are generally treated and rectified without causing any permanent damage.
Depending on the extent of your surgery, you can expect to spend anywhere from three days to a week or more limiting yourself to minimal physical activity. You certainly will not be bed ridden during this time, but you will be expected to avoid activity that is more strenuous than walking very short distances. You will also have to take very special care to avoid placing any strain on your incisions.

During a medium chemical peel, your doctor will use a gauze, special sponge, or a cotton-tipped applicator to apply the chemical solution to your face. This may contain glycolic acid or trichloroacetic acid. A blue color may be added to the trichloroacetic acid, commonly known as a blue peel. The skin will begin to whiten, and your doctor will apply a cool compress to the skin. You may feel stinging or burning for up to 20 minutes. No neutralizing solution is needed, though they may give you a hand-held fan to cool your skin. If you’ve had the blue peel you will have a blue coloring of your skin that may last for several days after the peel.

“Unwanted side effects are hyper or hypopigmentation, swelling, or infection,” says Dr. Davin Lim, a Brisbane, Queensland dermatologist, in a RealSelf Q&A. “Expected side effects are redness, flaking, and dryness, and can be easily managed. You can manage these risks by doing the following: sun protection, prepping your skin before chemical peels, avoiding active ingredients one to two days before treatment, and consulting with an experienced cosmetic provider and following aftercare instructions.”

You need to ensure that you get adequate rest, “for comfort when lying down, rest in bed with two or three pillows behind your head and a pillow under your knees,” says San Diego plastic surgeon Dr. Gilbert Lee. “Get out of bed by sitting up first, then moving your legs over the edge of the bed, and then standing from there. This is when you might need to rely on your caretaker for the first day or so — to help you out of bed.”
"That same day after my surgery was completed, I was able to walk by myself and get dressed," Jeanette said. "The pain wasn't there at all. It felt tight, but I was moving around just fine. As Dr. Barone instructed, I just took it easy. Wearing my support garment helped a lot, and I went on with doing what I needed to do with no issues. My friends and family were like, ‘Wow, we cannot believe you just had surgery.'
Some doctors don’t believe wearing a binder is necessary, but others may recommend wearing one for up to six weeks. Doctors who choose to use binders place their patients in one right after surgery. You’ll wear it 24 hours a day for the first week, changing to less compression and fewer hours over the next few weeks. Follow your surgeon’s recommendation.

During a medium chemical peel, your doctor will use a gauze, special sponge, or a cotton-tipped applicator to apply the chemical solution to your face. This may contain glycolic acid or trichloroacetic acid. A blue color may be added to the trichloroacetic acid, commonly known as a blue peel. The skin will begin to whiten, and your doctor will apply a cool compress to the skin. You may feel stinging or burning for up to 20 minutes. No neutralizing solution is needed, though they may give you a hand-held fan to cool your skin. If you’ve had the blue peel you will have a blue coloring of your skin that may last for several days after the peel.
There are variations on the tummy tuck operation which will have variable recovery rates. the main factor is whether the muscle has been tightened. It is the muscle manipulation which slows the recovery. I tell my patients surgery on skin is less painful than muscle. As a general rule, patients are off the pain medications by 5-7 days. Surgical drains need to be removed and this is usually... READ MORE

Depending on the extent of your surgery, you can expect to spend anywhere from three days to a week or more limiting yourself to minimal physical activity. You certainly will not be bed ridden during this time, but you will be expected to avoid activity that is more strenuous than walking very short distances. You will also have to take very special care to avoid placing any strain on your incisions.
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