Treatments for the plastic repair of a broken nose are first mentioned in the Edwin Smith Papyrus,[7] a transcription of an Ancient Egyptian medical text, one of the oldest known surgical treatises, dated to the Old Kingdom from 3000 to 2500 BC.[8] Reconstructive surgery techniques were being carried out in India by 800 BC.[9] Sushruta was a physician who made important contributions to the field of plastic and cataract surgery in 6th century BC.[10] The medical works of both Sushruta and Charaka, originally in Sanskrit, were translated into the Arabic language during the Abbasid Caliphate in 750 AD.[11] The Arabic translations made their way into Europe via intermediaries.[11] In Italy, the Branca family[12] of Sicily and Gaspare Tagliacozzi (Bologna) became familiar with the techniques of Sushruta.[11]


“One consideration is to ask your surgeon if they can use a long-acting local anesthetic agent such as Exparel, which, when injected in the six pack muscles and along the incision at the end of surgery can lessen postoperative discomfort, and reduce the need for narcotics for pain control after surgery. It’s a great tool to help our patients be more comfortable,” adds Jack.
Deep peels must be performed by a medical doctor and can take 14 to 21 days to heal. Deep peels require special aftercare including antiviral medication, ointments and follow-up visits, according to the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. The chemical solution used for deep peels may be phenol or trichloroacetic acid, which both reach far into the middle layer of your skin and remove damaged skin cells. Phenol chemical peels may require sedation and should only be done on the face, as the skin on the hands and neck is too thin. The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery explains this procedure may only be performed one time on a patient and is not recommended for people with darker skin or freckles, as it can cause hypopigmentation. Deep peels may cost anywhere from $3,500-$5,000—not including the doctor’s fees.
Look for products that have 2 to 10 percent glycolic acid, which is typically enough to improve the appearance of mature and sun damaged skin. Make sure your skin is makeup-free and clean of grease/residue before applying products, and read directions carefully. Afterwards, don’t shave, scrub, laser, exfoliate or exposure your skin to much sunlight for 24 to 48 hours. (11)

Obviously, you can expect some pain and tenderness following surgery, but your surgeon will provide you with a recommendation for pain management. I personally administer EXPAREL®, an injectable painkiller that provides three to four days of relief, and eliminates the need to take oral medication in order to maintain comfort. It is important to keep your bowels moving after abdominoplasty, so I always recommend that patients take laxatives during recovery. I also prescribe antibiotics to further reduce the risk of infection.
A ventral hernia occurs when part of the intestines push through a tear in the abdominal wall. These tears are sometimes the result of an incision made during a prior surgery. Either of these conditions can inhibit blood flow, which can in turn complicate the healing process. During a patient's initial consultation, I conduct my own physical analysis of the patient and a review of his or her medical history to determine if either of these conditions are present.

After a chemical peel, skin is temporarily more sensitive to the sun, so wear sunscreen every day. It should say "broad-spectrum" on the label, meaning it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB rays. Also, it should be a physical sunscreen and be above SPF 30. Limit your time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and wear a wide-brimmed hat.
Both standard and extended abdominoplasty often require that I place drainage tubes that help prevent the buildup of blood and fluid at the incision site. I will usually remove the first of these tubes after about three days, and the remainder are removed a few days later. I always provide a special support garment that can further prevent the buildup of fluid.

McIndoe is often recognized for not only developing new techniques for treating badly burned faces and hands but also for recognising the importance of the rehabilitation of the casualties and particularly of social reintegration back into normal life. He disposed of the "convalescent uniforms" and let the patients use their service uniforms instead. With the help of two friends, Neville and Elaine Blond, he also convinced the locals to support the patients and invite them to their homes. McIndoe kept referring to them as "his boys" and the staff called him "The Boss" or "The Maestro."[citation needed]

×