“There are many different types and depths [of peels], and they address different skin concerns and conditions,” says Dr. Neel Bector, a Mississauga, Ontario physician, in a chemical peel recovery Q&A. “A great peel with minimal downtime is a Jessner—it works well for pore size, scarring, and hyperpigmentation. You can expect some light peeling lasting approximately three days.”
There are several factors that determine the cost of a chemical peel. The most significant difference in cost is related to the type of chemical peel that is being performed. Superficial peels such as those containing salicylic acid or glycolic acid are typically much cheaper than the stronger medium- and deep-depth chemical peels, like the TCA peel and the phenol-croton oil peel. These stronger peels are often performed under anesthesia, which contributes an added cost, and may take more time to perform and manage after the procedure is complete. However, the results of these stronger peels are usually permanent, whereas a more superficial peel may require several repeat treatments to achieve an adequate result. The severity of the skin issues to be treated, such as the deepness of the wrinkles or the amount of pigmentation changes, will be factors in determining which treatment is right for you. I recommend that you schedule a consultation with a board-certified physician who specializes in facial skin care and can evaluate your particular concerns to recommend the treatment that is most effective for you within your proposed budget. Remember, when it comes to your face, cost is a consideration, but the most important thing is that you find someone who will provide you with safe and effective treatment!
The chemical solution for superficial peels — also known as light peels or lunchtime peels — is typically alpha hydroxy acid (AHA) or beta hydroxy acid. AHAs are naturally occurring compounds found in papayas, milk, sugar cane and other foods. Healing time for a superficial chemical peel is often between 1 and 7 days. Superficial peels are the most affordable and may range from under $100 to over $200, depending on the provider.
“Unwanted side effects are hyper or hypopigmentation, swelling, or infection,” says Dr. Davin Lim, a Brisbane, Queensland dermatologist, in a RealSelf Q&A. “Expected side effects are redness, flaking, and dryness, and can be easily managed. You can manage these risks by doing the following: sun protection, prepping your skin before chemical peels, avoiding active ingredients one to two days before treatment, and consulting with an experienced cosmetic provider and following aftercare instructions.”
Deep peels must be performed by a medical doctor and can take 14 to 21 days to heal. Deep peels require special aftercare including antiviral medication, ointments and follow-up visits, according to the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. The chemical solution used for deep peels may be phenol or trichloroacetic acid, which both reach far into the middle layer of your skin and remove damaged skin cells. Phenol chemical peels may require sedation and should only be done on the face, as the skin on the hands and neck is too thin. The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery explains this procedure may only be performed one time on a patient and is not recommended for people with darker skin or freckles, as it can cause hypopigmentation. Deep peels may cost anywhere from $3,500-$5,000—not including the doctor’s fees.
The use of Chemical peels is usually seen on the face, the neck, and the hands mostly. These are the areas normally exposed to the sun as well. The Peels once applied may form blisters on the surface, but will peel off automatically. As the name itself suggests, it is made of certain chemicals and there are different types people can find and use, depending on the purpose of the application. There is the short duration and instant type peels the trade would call lunchtime peels and there are also the deeper ones which will work deeper into the skin follicles and produce longer lasting results. The exact chemical used in these types will also vary accordingly. The Chemical Peels are chosen based on the need for a mild or a strong action on the skin.

This wonderful client wanted to look less tired and angry. She was treated with a full face rejuvenation technique, called Soft Lift, in one session. The Soft Lift combines the use of Botox and Juvederm filler to give her an overall refreshed and happier appearance. The 2nd photo was taken 1 week after her treatment to show that filler looks better with time. The 3rd photo was taken 1 month after the treatment. She loves her more fresher, youthful look!


After care from the experts was pretty simple and didn’t require anything too strenuous. To keep results looking optimum I’m told to avoid things such as smoking, excess alcohol, sun exposure and getting stressed - which can all help break down collagen faster, decreasing the longevity of Botox. ‘I always recommend that my clients use a daily antioxidant topical serum and an SPF 50 too,’ advises Spyrou.
Keep in mind that after a chemical peel, your skin will temporarily be more sensitive to the sun and any products you apply. Be sure to wear sunscreen (ideally one that’s broad spectrum and above SPF 30) and consider limiting the time you spend directly in the sun for several weeks. To protect your skin from irritation, also talk to your dermatologist before a peel about whether you should stop using certain types of products or medications — including those used to treat cold sores, Retin-A, Renova, glycolic acid or some antibiotics.

With breast implants, a routine screening mammography and self-examinations for breast cancer will be more difficult. Ask your doctor to help you distinguish the implant from your breast tissue. Symptoms of a ruptured implant may be hard knots or lumps surrounding the implant or in the armpit, change or loss of size or shape of the breast or implant, pain, tingling, swelling, numbness, burning, or hardening. Tell your doctor of these symptoms and remove ruptured implants.


Welcome to the practice of one of Montreal’s finest plastic surgeons, Dr. Arie Benchetrit. A Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Canada in both general surgery and plastic surgery, Dr. Benchetrit has been practicing since 1990. His years of experience marrying science and artistry to create beautiful and natural-looking results have earned him a loyal and devoted following amongst Montreal plastic surgery patients. Dr. Benchetrit’s work has been described by his satisfied patients as “amazing,” “life-changing” and “a dream come true.”
Cosmetic plastic surgery includes surgical and nonsurgical procedures that enhance and reshape structures of the body to improve appearance and confidence. Healthy individuals with a positive outlook and realistic expectations are appropriate candidates for cosmetic procedures. Plastic surgery is a personal choice and should be done for yourself, not to meet someone else’s expectations or to try to fit an ideal image. Because it is elective, cosmetic surgery is usually not covered by health insurance.
Before the procedure even begins, the professional who’s going to perform the procedure will first apply a chemical solution — usually trichloroacetic acid, glycolic acid, trichloroacetic acid, salicylic acid, lactic acid or carbolic acid (phenol) on small areas of your skin.  Doing so can create a controlled wound, allowing the new skin to take its place.
For me, the main area of concern is my forehead, which I’m told by all the greatest in injectables, to be the most common for those under thirty. After too many holiday sunburns, and recognising that I speak with very expressive eyebrows, the fine faint lines horizontally across my forehead have become much more prominent. So, in the name of beauty journalism I decided to give botox a try, here's what I learnt...

The price of a chemical peel will depend on a number of factors, but the starting point will be the condition or conditions that you are hoping to improve.  That will directly determine the type of chemical peel used, the strength, the area or areas being treated and the number of treatments that you require.  Of course the location of the clinic and experience of the professional treating you, will also be relevant.  

For example, you can make a homemade anti-aging serum— using jojoba oil, pomegranate seed oil, rosehip oil, and essential oils like lavender or frankincense — that richly hydrates your skin as well as provides antioxidant protection. Products that contain antioxidants and vitamins for your skin — like vitamins E, A and C —are also great for reducing sun damage and improving the appearance of skin.


Year after year, Botox ranks as the number one minimally invasive cosmetic procedure, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (which represents Canada’s Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons). In 2009, 4.8 million Botox cosmetic procedures were done in the U.S. That’s down four per cent from 2008, but still ahead of hyaluronic acid dermal fillers (such as Juvéderm and Restylane, which showed a seven per cent upswing). Botox also topped non-surgical procedures globally in survey results released in August by the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.
Before your procedure, you’ll first have a consultation with the skin care specialist. During this visit, they’ll help you determine what the best treatment option is for you. They’ll let you know the details about the specific peel you’ll be getting, and they’ll ask about anything that could interfere with the peel. This may include whether you’ve taken acne medication, and information about whether or not you scar easily.
Most SkinMedica® products are intended to meet the FDA’s definition of a cosmetic product, an article applied to the human body to cleanse, beautify, promote attractiveness, and alter appearances. These SkinMedica® products are not intended to be drug products that diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or condition. These products have not been approved by the FDA, and the statements have not been evaluated by the FDA.
Do not take BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.

For example, you can make a homemade anti-aging serum— using jojoba oil, pomegranate seed oil, rosehip oil, and essential oils like lavender or frankincense — that richly hydrates your skin as well as provides antioxidant protection. Products that contain antioxidants and vitamins for your skin — like vitamins E, A and C —are also great for reducing sun damage and improving the appearance of skin.
In January 2011, the United States Food and Drug Administration released a statement that women with breast implants "may have a very small but increased risk of developing" anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a rare cancer that can develop around breast implants.  The Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons is closely following developments around this issue.
Medium-depth peels — Helps to remove facial lines, scars and birthmarks, but can cause side effects and take longer to heal from. Most people will see at least some results after one treatment, but multiple treatments are usually needed for full effects. Some dermatologists now recommend mild to medium peels that use multiple acids rather than one single acid at a higher strength, as multiple acids can lead to less irritation.
×