Some people with a particular type of skin can face issues immediately after taking a Chemical Peels treatment for their skin. Some of them can even see some swelling and breaking of the skin surface that can take a few days to recover fully. Similarly, there are instances of alteration in the colour of the skin after the peel withers off. There have also been reports of scarring on the skin surface following a Chemical Peels treatment. It must, however, be added here that almost all these after effects are of temporary nature and they are generally treated and rectified without causing any permanent damage.
After your skin has been numbed, the solution is applied to your face and is left to ‘work’. The amount of time it’s left on your skin depends on the specific type of peel, and it could range from a few seconds to up to an hour for more lightweight peels. Some peels will be neutralized with water, and then a protective mask or layer of petroleum jelly is placed on your treated skin.
Do not receive BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.
The price of a chemical peel will depend on a number of factors, but the starting point will be the condition or conditions that you are hoping to improve.  That will directly determine the type of chemical peel used, the strength, the area or areas being treated and the number of treatments that you require.  Of course the location of the clinic and experience of the professional treating you, will also be relevant.  
When performed by an experienced cosmetic dermatologist or plastic surgeon, chemical facial peels are safe. With light and medium peels, relatively mild chemical peel side effects such as redness, stinging, and crusting usually subside within a day or two after the treatment. The side effects of deep chemical peels are typically more pronounced, and recovery time is longer. More serious side effects, such as infection and scarring, are possible, especially with medium and deep chemical peels. However, serious side effects are rare when the procedure is performed by a qualified doctor.
This 37 year old female patient was troubled by the furrows that were appearing between her brows. These furrows are one of the unavoidable signs of aging, but we were able to roll back the clock a little with a quick application of Botox. We have more Botox ‘forehead lines’ before-and-after photos available at our clinic if you’re interested. You can also schedule your consultation for a Botox treatment, here.

After the procedure is done, the skin will look as though it has been sunburned, and for about a week after the procedure has been done, the skin will start to peel, exposing the skin underneath.  It can be a few weeks before the skin heals properly.  Medium-depth peels, however, may result in swelling or blisters that crust or break down over time and can take a longer time to heal.

Through our website, we genuinely hope that you will discover more about our practice, the many cosmetic enhancement procedures and treatments available to you, and other useful information that will answer questions you might have about plastic surgery and the services we provide. We would also like to hear from you, so please contact us via telephone at (514) 695-7450 or email with any questions, comments, concerns or to schedule an appointment.
In the term "plastic surgery," the adjective plastic implies sculpting and/or reshaping, which is derived from the Greek πλαστική (τέχνη), plastikē (tekhnē), "the art of modelling" of malleable flesh.[2] This meaning in English is seen as early as 1598.[3] The surgical definition of "plastic" first appeared in 1839, preceding the modern "engineering material made from petroleum" sense of plastic (coined by Leo Baekeland in 1909) by 70 years.[4]
The average chemical peel can cost $500–$700 for each treatment, but prices range from $150 for a mild peel up to several thousand dollars for a series of deep peels. (10) While this might seem like a steep cost for good-looking skin, chemical peels are still less expensive than superficial fractional-laser treatments, which can run up to $1,000 a session and usually require multiple treatments.
Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including: plans to have surgery; had surgery on your face; have trouble raising your eyebrows; drooping eyelids; any other abnormal facial change; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic can harm your unborn baby); are breast-feeding or plan to (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic passes into breast milk).
Deep peels must be performed by a medical doctor and can take 14 to 21 days to heal. Deep peels require special aftercare including antiviral medication, ointments and follow-up visits, according to the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. The chemical solution used for deep peels may be phenol or trichloroacetic acid, which both reach far into the middle layer of your skin and remove damaged skin cells. Phenol chemical peels may require sedation and should only be done on the face, as the skin on the hands and neck is too thin. The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery explains this procedure may only be performed one time on a patient and is not recommended for people with darker skin or freckles, as it can cause hypopigmentation. Deep peels may cost anywhere from $3,500-$5,000—not including the doctor’s fees.
The chemical solution for body chemical peels is typically comprised of a combination of trichloroacetic acid (the main ingredient in a medium-depth skin peel) and glycolic acid (the main ingredient of a mild peel). The solution for body chemical peels is typically formulated to be slightly stronger than the chemical solution used for light or medium facial skin peels, though it is milder than the phenol solution used for deep skin peels.
For me, the main area of concern is my forehead, which I’m told by all the greatest in injectables, to be the most common for those under thirty. After too many holiday sunburns, and recognising that I speak with very expressive eyebrows, the fine faint lines horizontally across my forehead have become much more prominent. So, in the name of beauty journalism I decided to give botox a try, here's what I learnt...
Thorough preparation and a proper, well-monitored recovery spent carefully following your surgeon's instructions can result in a beautiful, natural-looking enhancement that provides you with many years of comfort, satisfaction, and boosted self-esteem. Patience is a virtue in every stage of your treatment. Be ready to discuss your medical history in great detail during your pre-op evaluation, and understand that you will be dramatically reducing your physical activity immediately following surgery.
During recovery, follow your doctor’s postop instructions faithfully. They’ll give you specific instructions for how often to wash your face and moisturize, and which products you should use to do so. Try to stay out of the sun until your skin has healed, and avoid using makeup or other cosmetics until your doctor gives you the go-ahead. You can use ice packs for 20 minutes at a time, or a cool fan, to help relieve discomfort at home.
Tell your doctor if you have received any other botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months; have received injections of botulinum toxin such as Myobloc®, Dysport®, or Xeomin® in the past (tell your doctor exactly which product you received); have recently received an antibiotic by injection; take muscle relaxants; take an allergy or cold medicine; take a sleep medicine; take aspirin-like products or blood thinners.
Deep chemical peels are the strongest of the facial peels. The chemical used for deep chemical peels is phenol acid. Deep peels are used to treat coarse facial wrinkles, blotches caused by aging or sun exposure, and pre-cancerous growths. While a deep chemical peel produces the most dramatic, longest-lasting results, the procedure takes longer than other peels (one to two hours) and requires the most healing time. Phenol acid is typically used only for facial peels. Because a deep chemical peel may cause permanent lightening of the skin, prospective patients should seek advice from a qualified cosmetic dermatologist before undergoing the procedure.
In terms of the steps to be followed immediately after the chemical peel is applied and it peels off, the need to apply a cold compress is essential to cool down the skin which has had the blisters. In addition, the skin remains sensitive for a few days and in addition to protecting the skin from being exposed to sunlight, suitable sunscreen lotion has to be used. If there are any damages to the skin and bandaging has to be done that has also to be done. Ultimately, the skin has to be taken care of and the type of skin differs from individual to individual and depending on the type of skin, suitable skin products may be prescribed by the doctor for ongoing care.
During World War I he worked as a medical minder with the Royal Army Medical Corps. After working with the renowned French oral and maxillofacial surgeon Hippolyte Morestin on skin graft, he persuaded the army's chief surgeon, Arbuthnot-Lane, to establish a facial injury ward at the Cambridge Military Hospital, Aldershot, later upgraded to a new hospital for facial repairs at Sidcup in 1917. There Gillies and his colleagues developed many techniques of plastic surgery; more than 11,000 operations were performed on more than 5,000 men (mostly soldiers with facial injuries, usually from gunshot wounds).[citation needed]After the war, Gillies developed a private practice with Rainsford Mowlem, including many famous patients, and travelled extensively to promote his advanced techniques worldwide.
Additionally, recent studies have found that certain chemical peels can help reverse melasma, a type of hyperpigmentary disorder and “notorious dermatosis” that is often resistant to treatments, including laser treatments. (8) Melasma is a common chronic form of hyperpigmentation of the skin that can have a serious impact on someone’s self-esteem and quality of life.
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