“Ensure that you take adequate time off from work,” says Taglienti. “For most people, this means two weeks. Granted, everyone heals differently, but if you take a full two weeks to rest after surgery, you will not feel as sore and tired when you return to work. Patients who do not give themselves a chance to heal properly can cause needless tension on the wound, and impede wound healing.”
“Occasionally, patients will certainly engage in activities that slow their recovery or cause complications. Probably the most impactful factor is not following the surgeon’s instructions. This is a big one,” says Jack. “We make postoperative instructions for a reason — to protect the patient and help ensure they heal well and have a good cosmetic outcome.”
Usually, good results would be expected from plastic surgery that emphasize careful planning of incisions so that they fall within the line of natural skin folds or lines, appropriate choice of wound closure, use of best available suture materials, and early removal of exposed sutures so that the wound is held closed by buried sutures.[original research?]

Each peel is slightly different, and the exact formula will depend on the intensity level of the treatment. However, the most common chemicals used in peels are alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs), beta hydroxy acids (BHAs), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and phenol. AHAs and BHAs are the lightest acids, often used in light chemical peels. TCA can be used in many different formulations. Last but not least, phenol is the strongest chemical and only used in deep peels.


Both standard and extended abdominoplasty often require that I place drainage tubes that help prevent the buildup of blood and fluid at the incision site. I will usually remove the first of these tubes after about three days, and the remainder are removed a few days later. I always provide a special support garment that can further prevent the buildup of fluid.
This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.

Look for products that have 2 to 10 percent glycolic acid, which is typically enough to improve the appearance of mature and sun damaged skin. Make sure your skin is makeup-free and clean of grease/residue before applying products, and read directions carefully. Afterwards, don’t shave, scrub, laser, exfoliate or exposure your skin to much sunlight for 24 to 48 hours. (11)


During a medium chemical peel, your doctor will use a gauze, special sponge, or a cotton-tipped applicator to apply the chemical solution to your face. This may contain glycolic acid or trichloroacetic acid. A blue color may be added to the trichloroacetic acid, commonly known as a blue peel. The skin will begin to whiten, and your doctor will apply a cool compress to the skin. You may feel stinging or burning for up to 20 minutes. No neutralizing solution is needed, though they may give you a hand-held fan to cool your skin. If you’ve had the blue peel you will have a blue coloring of your skin that may last for several days after the peel.
BDD is a disorder resulting in the sufferer becoming "preoccupied with what they regard as defects in their bodies or faces." Alternatively, where there is a slight physical anomaly, then the person’s concern is markedly excessive.[39] While 2% of people suffer from body dysmorphic disorder in the United States, 15% of patients seeing a dermatologist and cosmetic surgeons have the disorder. Half of the patients with the disorder who have cosmetic surgery performed are not pleased with the aesthetic outcome. BDD can lead to suicide in some of its sufferers. While many with BDD seek cosmetic surgery, the procedures do not treat BDD, and can ultimately worsen the problem. The psychological root of the problem is usually unidentified; therefore causing the treatment to be even more difficult. Some say that the fixation or obsession with correction of the area could be a sub-disorder such as anorexia or muscle dysmorphia.[40] The increased use of body and facial reshaping applications such as Snapchat and Facetune have been identified as a potential triggers of BDD. Recently, a phenomenon referred to as 'Snapchat dysmorphia' has appeared to describe people who request surgery to resemble the edited version of themselves as they appear through Snapchat Filters.[41]
Dr. Benchetrit is one of the very few surgeons in Canada to own the Vectra 3D photography system. This revolutionary device can take 3D photos of the patient’s face breasts or body and can simulate the results of the planned surgery on a computer screen. For rhinoplasty surgery this allows the patient to decide what degree of change he or she desires to the different parts of the nose. For a patient considering breast implants or a breast lift, she can visualise a simulation of her surgical results according to the size and shape of the implants she has selected. The Vectra 3D photography device makes it easier for the patient to make his or her aesthetic decisions and, by giving a “preview” of the final result, takes much of the worry out of the process. Read more.
In 1891, American otorhinolaryngologist John Roe presented an example of his work: a young woman on whom he reduced a dorsal nasal hump for cosmetic indications. In 1892, Robert Weir experimented unsuccessfully with xenografts (duck sternum) in the reconstruction of sunken noses. In 1896, James Israel, a urological surgeon from Germany, and in 1889 George Monks of the United States each described the successful use of heterogeneous free-bone grafting to reconstruct saddle nose defects. In 1898, Jacques Joseph, the German orthopaedic-trained surgeon, published his first account of reduction rhinoplasty. In 1928, Jacques Joseph published Nasenplastik und Sonstige Gesichtsplastik.
“Unwanted side effects are hyper or hypopigmentation, swelling, or infection,” says Dr. Davin Lim, a Brisbane, Queensland dermatologist, in a RealSelf Q&A. “Expected side effects are redness, flaking, and dryness, and can be easily managed. You can manage these risks by doing the following: sun protection, prepping your skin before chemical peels, avoiding active ingredients one to two days before treatment, and consulting with an experienced cosmetic provider and following aftercare instructions.”
Anyone who faces skin related ailments can undergo Chemical Peels treatment. The observation from experience is that people with fairer skin seem to obtain better results than those with darker skin, though in terms of the benefits all types of skin will see some change after the treatment. And those having specific issues like wrinkles or sunburns are definitely the ideal persons to undergo this treatment.
Thorough preparation and a proper, well-monitored recovery spent carefully following your surgeon's instructions can result in a beautiful, natural-looking enhancement that provides you with many years of comfort, satisfaction, and boosted self-esteem. Patience is a virtue in every stage of your treatment. Be ready to discuss your medical history in great detail during your pre-op evaluation, and understand that you will be dramatically reducing your physical activity immediately following surgery.
Medium-depth peels — Helps to remove facial lines, scars and birthmarks, but can cause side effects and take longer to heal from. Most people will see at least some results after one treatment, but multiple treatments are usually needed for full effects. Some dermatologists now recommend mild to medium peels that use multiple acids rather than one single acid at a higher strength, as multiple acids can lead to less irritation.
“The safety and efficacy of any chemical peel are dependent upon preparation, depth, post care, and the experience of the clinician administering the peel,” says Dr. Larry C. Leverett, a Phoenix plastic surgeon, in a chemical peel Q&A. “When treating African-American skin and other ethnic skin types, prepping the skin for a chemical peel is a necessity. … Our patients must prep for at least four weeks prior to the peel, are educated extensively on how to care for their skin post peel, and are encouraged to adhere to their prescribed skin care regimen to obtain optimal results.”
In order to minimize your risk of developing blood clots, you will be asked to stop taking birth control at least two weeks before surgery. You will also have to stop taking any hormones or supplements such as fish oil, and aspirin. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons requires that you sign a consent form confirming the cessation of all supplement intake. In addition to reducing your risk of developing blood clots, stopping your intake of supplements and other medications also helps to minimize bleeding during surgery.
This wonderful client wanted to look less tired and angry. She was treated with a full face rejuvenation technique, called Soft Lift, in one session. The Soft Lift combines the use of Botox and Juvederm filler to give her an overall refreshed and happier appearance. The 2nd photo was taken 1 week after her treatment to show that filler looks better with time. The 3rd photo was taken 1 month after the treatment. She loves her more fresher, youthful look!
Dr. Robert L. Shenker and Dr. Stephanie Ma are Royal College-certified specialists at The Cosmetic Surgery Clinic in Kitchener-Waterloo. The team of surgeons serves patients from Guelph, Cambridge, and London, Ontario, specializing in cosmetic and reconstructive breast surgery, surgical and non-surgical facial rejuvenation, and body contouring procedures.
Some people with a particular type of skin can face issues immediately after taking a Chemical Peels treatment for their skin. Some of them can even see some swelling and breaking of the skin surface that can take a few days to recover fully. Similarly, there are instances of alteration in the colour of the skin after the peel withers off. There have also been reports of scarring on the skin surface following a Chemical Peels treatment. It must, however, be added here that almost all these after effects are of temporary nature and they are generally treated and rectified without causing any permanent damage.
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