The best reaction came from my mum, who is always honest. She isn’t afraid to tell me I look tired, pale or spotty, but when I saw her after my treatment she couldn’t have been more complimentary. After confiding in her that I had botox she yelped and said, ‘Wow you did really need it, now you look so fresh, like you’ve had a month of great sleep’. Thanks mum.
The use of Chemical peels is usually seen on the face, the neck, and the hands mostly. These are the areas normally exposed to the sun as well. The Peels once applied may form blisters on the surface, but will peel off automatically. As the name itself suggests, it is made of certain chemicals and there are different types people can find and use, depending on the purpose of the application. There is the short duration and instant type peels the trade would call lunchtime peels and there are also the deeper ones which will work deeper into the skin follicles and produce longer lasting results. The exact chemical used in these types will also vary accordingly. The Chemical Peels are chosen based on the need for a mild or a strong action on the skin.

Each peel is slightly different, and the exact formula will depend on the intensity level of the treatment. However, the most common chemicals used in peels are alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs), beta hydroxy acids (BHAs), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and phenol. AHAs and BHAs are the lightest acids, often used in light chemical peels. TCA can be used in many different formulations. Last but not least, phenol is the strongest chemical and only used in deep peels.


During a pre-op consultation, you should be prepared to discuss your medication and supplement regimen in great detail. You should also be prepared to talk about your own medical history. Both of these aspects have to be reviewed in order to assess your risk of developing potentially dangerous blood clots and bleeding excessively during surgery. If you use tobacco, you must also understand that you will be expected to stop nicotine intake of all kinds at least three months prior to surgery, and continue to abstain during recovery.
Patients are urged not to smoke for a few weeks before and after a chemical peel. The best outcomes will be achieved in patients who are not taking the acne medication Accutane®, have not taken it for the previous year and a half, and who are free of active skin infections. Also, if you have large or unusual scar formations, such as keloids, your doctor may recommend a different treatment for you. Patients who have a family history of heart problems are not considered good candidates for the deep chemical peel procedure.
Cosmetic surgery is a voluntary or elective surgery that is performed on normal parts of the body with the only purpose of improving a person’s appearance and/or removing signs of aging. In 2014, nearly 16 million cosmetic procedures were performed in the United States alone.[22] The number of cosmetic procedures performed in the United States has almost doubled since the start of the century. 92% of cosmetic procedures were performed on women in 2014, up from 88% in 2001.[23] Nearly 12 million cosmetic procedures were performed in 2007, with the five most common surgeries being breast augmentation, liposuction, breast reduction, eyelid surgery and abdominoplasty. The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery looks at the statistics for 34 different cosmetic procedures. Nineteen of the procedures are surgical, such as rhinoplasty or facelift. The nonsurgical procedures include Botox and laser hair removal. In 2010, their survey revealed that there were 9,336,814 total procedures in the United States. Of those, 1,622,290 procedures were surgical (p. 5). They also found that a large majority, 81%, of the procedures were done on Caucasian people (p. 12).[24] The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) estimates that more than 333,000 cosmetic procedures were performed on patients 18 years of age or younger in the US in 2005 compared to approx. 14,000 in 1996. This is significant because it encourages younger people to continue these procedures later in life.[25] The increased use of cosmetic procedures crosses racial and ethnic lines in the U.S., with increases seen among African-Americans, Asian Americans and Hispanic Americans as well as Caucasian Americans. In Europe, the second largest market for cosmetic procedures, cosmetic surgery is a $2.2 billion business.[26] Of 1191 UK newspaper articles, 89% used the term ‘plastic surgery’ in the context of cosmetic surgery. This is significant as it shows the frequency in which the western world portrays cosmetic surgery.[27] In Asia, cosmetic surgery has become more popular, and countries such as China and India have become Asia's biggest cosmetic surgery markets.[28] South Korea is also rising in popularity due to their expertise in facial bone surgeries. The first publication by a team of South Korean surgeons on facial bone contouring surgeries was published illustrating various surgery methods used for facial bone contouring surgeries.[29]
Keep in mind that after a chemical peel, your skin will temporarily be more sensitive to the sun and any products you apply. Be sure to wear sunscreen (ideally one that’s broad spectrum and above SPF 30) and consider limiting the time you spend directly in the sun for several weeks. To protect your skin from irritation, also talk to your dermatologist before a peel about whether you should stop using certain types of products or medications — including those used to treat cold sores, Retin-A, Renova, glycolic acid or some antibiotics.
With breast implants, a routine screening mammography and self-examinations for breast cancer will be more difficult. Ask your doctor to help you distinguish the implant from your breast tissue. Symptoms of a ruptured implant may be hard knots or lumps surrounding the implant or in the armpit, change or loss of size or shape of the breast or implant, pain, tingling, swelling, numbness, burning, or hardening. Tell your doctor of these symptoms and remove ruptured implants.
“Unwanted side effects are hyper or hypopigmentation, swelling, or infection,” says Dr. Davin Lim, a Brisbane, Queensland dermatologist, in a RealSelf Q&A. “Expected side effects are redness, flaking, and dryness, and can be easily managed. You can manage these risks by doing the following: sun protection, prepping your skin before chemical peels, avoiding active ingredients one to two days before treatment, and consulting with an experienced cosmetic provider and following aftercare instructions.”

“Believe it or not, patients who are overweight are malnourished. What that means is that their capacity to heal is very poor,” says Grossman. “Patients who are malnourished have more seromas or fluid accumulations. In fact, about 50% of all patients will form a seroma when not stabilized nutritionally. So, at my practice we have an extensive approach to nutrition before and after the surgery.”
After a chemical peel, skin is temporarily more sensitive to the sun, so wear sunscreen every day. It should say "broad-spectrum" on the label, meaning it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB rays. Also, it should be a physical sunscreen and be above SPF 30. Limit your time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and wear a wide-brimmed hat.

“Ensure that you take adequate time off from work,” says Taglienti. “For most people, this means two weeks. Granted, everyone heals differently, but if you take a full two weeks to rest after surgery, you will not feel as sore and tired when you return to work. Patients who do not give themselves a chance to heal properly can cause needless tension on the wound, and impede wound healing.”
Chemical peels rarely result in serious complications, but certain risks do exist. These risks include scarring, infection, swelling, changes in skin tone, and cold sore outbreaks. You can reduce the risks associated with facial peels by following all of the doctor’s instructions completely and by providing your doctor with a complete medical history.
The right chemical peel for you depends on your skin goals. For exfoliation and glowy skin, a light chemical peel is typically used. Medium peels are best for pigment irregularities, like age spots, and deep chemical peels can penetrate deep skin layers and combat fine wrinkles. Your provider can help you choose the right treatment option for your goals.

Do not use LATISSE® if you are allergic to one of its ingredients. If you use/used prescription products for eye pressure problems, use LATISSE® under doctor care. May cause brown darkening of the colored part of the eye which is likely permanent. LATISSE® may cause eyelid skin darkening which may be reversible. Only apply at base of upper lashes. DO NOT APPLY to lower lid. Hair may grow outside the treatment area. If you have eye problems/surgery, consult your doctor. Common side effects include itchy and red eyes. If discontinued, lashes gradually return to previous appearance.
A study published in 2009 in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology found that Botox may also improve a person’s mood. The theory there? The less you scowl — a facial expression that’s not easy to make with a smoothed brow — the more upbeat you feel. People who like it (some of my friends included) say it’s simply one item on the menu of ways to stay youthful looking, especially in a competitive workforce.
After relaying to Nurse Libbie that I didn’t want it to look ‘too frozen’, she agrees to give me 10 units across my forehead, and 15 in the centre of my frown- the average dose is between 10-25 units. I lay down across the bed in her treatment room and as she preps the solution, I’m asked to frown and raise my brows. As I do so she inserts the needle, and a tiny dose of botox by Allergen is inserted across six points of my forehead and in between my eyebrows.
Dr. Benchetrit is one of the very few surgeons in Canada to own the Vectra 3D photography system. This revolutionary device can take 3D photos of the patient’s face breasts or body and can simulate the results of the planned surgery on a computer screen. For rhinoplasty surgery this allows the patient to decide what degree of change he or she desires to the different parts of the nose. For a patient considering breast implants or a breast lift, she can visualise a simulation of her surgical results according to the size and shape of the implants she has selected. The Vectra 3D photography device makes it easier for the patient to make his or her aesthetic decisions and, by giving a “preview” of the final result, takes much of the worry out of the process. Read more.
Additionally, recent studies have found that certain chemical peels can help reverse melasma, a type of hyperpigmentary disorder and “notorious dermatosis” that is often resistant to treatments, including laser treatments. (8) Melasma is a common chronic form of hyperpigmentation of the skin that can have a serious impact on someone’s self-esteem and quality of life.
Common side effects are bruising and swelling. Rarely, there is “serum sickness,” which manifests as flu-like symptoms that subside in a few hours, says Mulholland. “A dreaded complication is that the Botox travels through fatty tissues to muscles it wasn’t intended to block — like a muscle of the eyelid, which leads to ptosis (droopy eye), or the muscles that move the eyeball, leading to double vision.” He says these happen to less than one per cent of patients and go away within two weeks. The Botox Cosmetic website states asthma symptoms and inability to swallow have also been reported.
After care from the experts was pretty simple and didn’t require anything too strenuous. To keep results looking optimum I’m told to avoid things such as smoking, excess alcohol, sun exposure and getting stressed - which can all help break down collagen faster, decreasing the longevity of Botox. ‘I always recommend that my clients use a daily antioxidant topical serum and an SPF 50 too,’ advises Spyrou.
During the procedure, you may experience sensations of pulling, tugging, mild pinching, intense cold, tingling, stinging, aching, and cramping at the treatment site. These sensations subside as the area becomes numb. Following the procedure, typical side effects include temporary redness, swelling, blanching, bruising, firmness, tingling, stinging, tenderness, cramping, aching, itching, or skin sensitivity, and sensation of fullness in the back of the throat after a submental area treatment. Rare side effects may also occur. The CoolSculpting® procedure is not for everyone. You should not have the CoolSculpting® procedure if you suffer from cryoglobulinemia, cold agglutinin disease, or paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. The CoolSculpting® procedure is not a treatment for obesity. Ask your doctor if CoolSculpting® is right for you. To learn more about what to expect, visit coolsculpting.com.
In general, patients with fair skin and light hair are the best chemical peel candidates. However, patients with other skin pigmentation and hair color can achieve good results as well. Ideal candidates for the chemical peel procedure are individuals who are unhappy with the appearance of their skin, have realistic expectations of their procedure, and do not smoke.  
During a pre-op consultation, you should be prepared to discuss your medication and supplement regimen in great detail. You should also be prepared to talk about your own medical history. Both of these aspects have to be reviewed in order to assess your risk of developing potentially dangerous blood clots and bleeding excessively during surgery. If you use tobacco, you must also understand that you will be expected to stop nicotine intake of all kinds at least three months prior to surgery, and continue to abstain during recovery. 

In 1930, Gillies' cousin, Archibald McIndoe, joined the practice and became committed to plastic surgery. When World War II broke out, plastic surgery provision was largely divided between the different services of the armed forces, and Gillies and his team were split up. Gillies himself was sent to Rooksdown House near Basingstoke, which became the principal army plastic surgery unit; Tommy Kilner (who had worked with Gillies during the First World War, and who now has a surgical instrument named after him, the kilner cheek retractor), went to Queen Mary's Hospital, Roehampton, and Mowlem to St Albans. McIndoe, consultant to the RAF, moved to the recently rebuilt Queen Victoria Hospital in East Grinstead, Sussex, and founded a Centre for Plastic and Jaw Surgery. There, he treated very deep burn, and serious facial disfigurement, such as loss of eyelids, typical of those caused to aircrew by burning fuel.[citation needed]
"That same day after my surgery was completed, I was able to walk by myself and get dressed," Jeanette said. "The pain wasn't there at all. It felt tight, but I was moving around just fine. As Dr. Barone instructed, I just took it easy. Wearing my support garment helped a lot, and I went on with doing what I needed to do with no issues. My friends and family were like, ‘Wow, we cannot believe you just had surgery.'
Obviously, you can expect some pain and tenderness following surgery, but your surgeon will provide you with a recommendation for pain management. I personally administer EXPAREL®, an injectable painkiller that provides three to four days of relief, and eliminates the need to take oral medication in order to maintain comfort. It is important to keep your bowels moving after abdominoplasty, so I always recommend that patients take laxatives during recovery. I also prescribe antibiotics to further reduce the risk of infection.
During the procedure, you may experience sensations of pulling, tugging, mild pinching, intense cold, tingling, stinging, aching, and cramping at the treatment site. These sensations subside as the area becomes numb. Following the procedure, typical side effects include temporary redness, swelling, blanching, bruising, firmness, tingling, stinging, tenderness, cramping, aching, itching, or skin sensitivity, and sensation of fullness in the back of the throat after a submental area treatment. Rare side effects may also occur. The CoolSculpting® procedure is not for everyone. You should not have the CoolSculpting® procedure if you suffer from cryoglobulinemia, cold agglutinin disease, or paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. The CoolSculpting® procedure is not a treatment for obesity. Ask your doctor if CoolSculpting® is right for you. To learn more about what to expect, visit coolsculpting.com.
After relaying to Nurse Libbie that I didn’t want it to look ‘too frozen’, she agrees to give me 10 units across my forehead, and 15 in the centre of my frown- the average dose is between 10-25 units. I lay down across the bed in her treatment room and as she preps the solution, I’m asked to frown and raise my brows. As I do so she inserts the needle, and a tiny dose of botox by Allergen is inserted across six points of my forehead and in between my eyebrows.
An ideal candidate for a chemical peel is in good physical health, understands the procedure, and has realistic expectations of the outcome. You are likely to be pleased with the results of a chemical peel if your goal is to alleviate acne, smooth wrinkles, improve skin texture, eliminate age spots, or reduce the effects of sun damage. The different types of chemical peels come in varying strengths and provide different levels of treatment. Ask your doctor which chemical peel is best for your skin type and needs.
Tell your doctor if you have received any other botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months; have received injections of botulinum toxin such as Myobloc®, Dysport®, or Xeomin® in the past (tell your doctor exactly which product you received); have recently received an antibiotic by injection; take muscle relaxants; take an allergy or cold medicine; take a sleep medicine; take aspirin-like products or blood thinners.
Botox is a neuromodulator that is used to relax muscles and, therefore, is able to reduce wrinkles. This beautiful client was treated with Botox to relax the muscles around the eyes to soften her wrinkles and crow’s feet lines. Juvederm filler was used under her eyes to treat the hollowness in the tear trough area. Juvederm Filler was also used to enhance her cheeks to restore volume where she once had, for a more youthful look.
Do not take BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.
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