They come in a range of strengths, from deeper phenol-based peels to more superficial peels like glycolic acid. Deeper peels may not be right for everyone, particularly if you have sensitive skin. A few light or medium-depth peels can often achieve similar results to one deeper peel treatment, with less risk and a shorter recovery time. Talk to a qualified provider about your goals to see if a chemical peel would work for your concern and skin.
Your doctor may numb the area with a topical anesthetic, especially if you’re receiving a deep peel. For deep peels, your doctor may also use a regional anesthetic, which will numb large areas. They are particularly likely to do this if you’re having your face and neck treated. For deep peels, you’ll also be given an IV, and your heart rate will be closely monitored.

Key complications are reoperation, implant removal with or without replacement, implant rupture with silicone-filled implants, implant deflation with saline-filled implants, and severe capsular contracture (severe scar tissue around the implant). Other complications include asymmetry, nipple/breast/skin sensation changes, scarring, or wrinkling/rippling. Talk to your doctor about other complications.
In general, patients with fair skin and light hair are the best chemical peel candidates. However, patients with other skin pigmentation and hair color can achieve good results as well. Ideal candidates for the chemical peel procedure are individuals who are unhappy with the appearance of their skin, have realistic expectations of their procedure, and do not smoke.  
Nicotine causes blood vessels to become more narrow, making it difficult for red blood cells to deliver oxygen to the skin cells at the incision site. When the delivery of oxygen is inhibited, it can delay healing considerably. Meanwhile, if the function of white blood cells is compromised, a patient has a much greater likelihood of developing an infection, which can result in serious health complications and take a toll on the aesthetic results. If you are a smoker who is considering undergoing abdominoplasty, it is not too early to begin exploring strategies to eliminate nicotine from your life for good.
"Healing from a tummy tuck does involve some level of discomfort for the first week or two, and restricting activities is an important component of a smooth recovery," says Dr. Jon A. Perlman, a Beverly Hills, California, plastic surgeon. He says that incisions can be "healed and strong" after two weeks and become less visible and flat over nine months to a year.
Depending on the extent of your surgery, you can expect to spend anywhere from three days to a week or more limiting yourself to minimal physical activity. You certainly will not be bed ridden during this time, but you will be expected to avoid activity that is more strenuous than walking very short distances. You will also have to take very special care to avoid placing any strain on your incisions.
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