Before the procedure even begins, the professional who’s going to perform the procedure will first apply a chemical solution — usually trichloroacetic acid, glycolic acid, trichloroacetic acid, salicylic acid, lactic acid or carbolic acid (phenol) on small areas of your skin.  Doing so can create a controlled wound, allowing the new skin to take its place.
The use of Chemical peels is usually seen on the face, the neck, and the hands mostly. These are the areas normally exposed to the sun as well. The Peels once applied may form blisters on the surface, but will peel off automatically. As the name itself suggests, it is made of certain chemicals and there are different types people can find and use, depending on the purpose of the application. There is the short duration and instant type peels the trade would call lunchtime peels and there are also the deeper ones which will work deeper into the skin follicles and produce longer lasting results. The exact chemical used in these types will also vary accordingly. The Chemical Peels are chosen based on the need for a mild or a strong action on the skin.
In 1930, Gillies' cousin, Archibald McIndoe, joined the practice and became committed to plastic surgery. When World War II broke out, plastic surgery provision was largely divided between the different services of the armed forces, and Gillies and his team were split up. Gillies himself was sent to Rooksdown House near Basingstoke, which became the principal army plastic surgery unit; Tommy Kilner (who had worked with Gillies during the First World War, and who now has a surgical instrument named after him, the kilner cheek retractor), went to Queen Mary's Hospital, Roehampton, and Mowlem to St Albans. McIndoe, consultant to the RAF, moved to the recently rebuilt Queen Victoria Hospital in East Grinstead, Sussex, and founded a Centre for Plastic and Jaw Surgery. There, he treated very deep burn, and serious facial disfigurement, such as loss of eyelids, typical of those caused to aircrew by burning fuel.[citation needed]
I needed very little convincing before making my way down to the Cadogan Clinic, one of the very best locations in London (might I add) to speak to Nurse Libbie Wallace, a master in her field. After filling in a short consultation form, Nurse Libbie asks me how old I am. After replying 28, she chuckles a little, but continues… I’m not the youngest client she’s had walk through the door, but she does tell me that she would only ever treat those that actually can benefit from the treatment, ‘It’s important that I manage patients expectations’.
Dr. Robert L. Shenker and Dr. Stephanie Ma are Royal College-certified specialists at The Cosmetic Surgery Clinic in Kitchener-Waterloo. The team of surgeons serves patients from Guelph, Cambridge, and London, Ontario, specializing in cosmetic and reconstructive breast surgery, surgical and non-surgical facial rejuvenation, and body contouring procedures.
Chemical peels can range in costs from a few hundred dollars to a thousand dollars depending on the strength of the acid peel and what type of peel is being performed.  The costs also range on who is performing the peels.  In my office only the physician (myself) performs the peels and I use medical grade peels which only a physician can administer.  The results are wonderful and leave your skin smoother and rejuvenated.
Chemical peels can range in costs from a few hundred dollars to a thousand dollars depending on the strength of the acid peel and what type of peel is being performed.  The costs also range on who is performing the peels.  In my office only the physician (myself) performs the peels and I use medical grade peels which only a physician can administer.  The results are wonderful and leave your skin smoother and rejuvenated.

Patients are urged not to smoke for a few weeks before and after a chemical peel. The best outcomes will be achieved in patients who are not taking the acne medication Accutane®, have not taken it for the previous year and a half, and who are free of active skin infections. Also, if you have large or unusual scar formations, such as keloids, your doctor may recommend a different treatment for you. Patients who have a family history of heart problems are not considered good candidates for the deep chemical peel procedure.

Dr. Robert L. Shenker and Dr. Stephanie Ma are Royal College-certified specialists at The Cosmetic Surgery Clinic in Kitchener-Waterloo. The team of surgeons serves patients from Guelph, Cambridge, and London, Ontario, specializing in cosmetic and reconstructive breast surgery, surgical and non-surgical facial rejuvenation, and body contouring procedures.
Key complications are reoperation, implant removal with or without replacement, implant rupture with silicone-filled implants, implant deflation with saline-filled implants, and severe capsular contracture (severe scar tissue around the implant). Other complications include asymmetry, nipple/breast/skin sensation changes, scarring, or wrinkling/rippling. Talk to your doctor about other complications.
“Unwanted side effects are hyper or hypopigmentation, swelling, or infection,” says Dr. Davin Lim, a Brisbane, Queensland dermatologist, in a RealSelf Q&A. “Expected side effects are redness, flaking, and dryness, and can be easily managed. You can manage these risks by doing the following: sun protection, prepping your skin before chemical peels, avoiding active ingredients one to two days before treatment, and consulting with an experienced cosmetic provider and following aftercare instructions.”
Look for products that have 2 to 10 percent glycolic acid, which is typically enough to improve the appearance of mature and sun damaged skin. Make sure your skin is makeup-free and clean of grease/residue before applying products, and read directions carefully. Afterwards, don’t shave, scrub, laser, exfoliate or exposure your skin to much sunlight for 24 to 48 hours. (11)
Myfatbelly, After seven weeks of healing you are pretty far along and it sounds like you are making progress. Standing full and upright is something we expect to see in most patients after the first week, and some actuallly return to work and gentle activities after two weeks though the pace of recovery can vary. You are on the slow side but don't worry. Full tummy tuck is not a single... READ MORE

"Personally, I think people need to mentally prepare themselves," she said. "You just had surgery, so of course your body will swell. You will be thinking, ‘Okay, I'm going to get a tummy tuck, and then I'm going to look amazing.' But that takes time. It's a process, and you need to be aware of that. You won't see an amazing new tummy after one or two days. It will be flat, but the swelling takes up to a year to finally subside."
Through our website, we genuinely hope that you will discover more about our practice, the many cosmetic enhancement procedures and treatments available to you, and other useful information that will answer questions you might have about plastic surgery and the services we provide. We would also like to hear from you, so please contact us via telephone at (514) 695-7450 or email with any questions, comments, concerns or to schedule an appointment.
During the procedure, you may experience sensations of pulling, tugging, mild pinching, intense cold, tingling, stinging, aching, and cramping at the treatment site. These sensations subside as the area becomes numb. Following the procedure, typical side effects include temporary redness, swelling, blanching, bruising, firmness, tingling, stinging, tenderness, cramping, aching, itching, or skin sensitivity, and sensation of fullness in the back of the throat after a submental area treatment. Rare side effects may also occur. The CoolSculpting® procedure is not for everyone. You should not have the CoolSculpting® procedure if you suffer from cryoglobulinemia, cold agglutinin disease, or paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. The CoolSculpting® procedure is not a treatment for obesity. Ask your doctor if CoolSculpting® is right for you. To learn more about what to expect, visit coolsculpting.com. 

Chemical Peels range from the Superficial, which will give you gentle exfoliation and can be repeated at frequent intervals, to Medium which will use stronger solutions and achiever greater peeling, to Deep, which as the name suggests will produce more visible results but the potential for complications and side effects with Deep Peels is also much greater.  
Key complications are reoperation, implant removal with or without replacement, implant rupture with silicone-filled implants, implant deflation with saline-filled implants, and severe capsular contracture (severe scar tissue around the implant). Other complications include asymmetry, nipple/breast/skin sensation changes, scarring, or wrinkling/rippling. Talk to your doctor about other complications.
Yes, all chemical peels require some downtime. Light flaking, irritation, and peeling usually occur for a few days after light peels. It can take up to six weeks for skin to return to its normal appearance following a medium chemical peel. Deep chemical peels are closer in nature to a surgical treatment—patients are usually asked to rest their skin for two weeks before they're able to resume normal activities or wear makeup. Skin may remain red in appearance for up to three months.
The right chemical peel for you depends on your skin goals. For exfoliation and glowy skin, a light chemical peel is typically used. Medium peels are best for pigment irregularities, like age spots, and deep chemical peels can penetrate deep skin layers and combat fine wrinkles. Your provider can help you choose the right treatment option for your goals.

Do not take BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.
A chemical peel is a skin-resurfacing procedure that uses a solution of various chemicals that are applied to the skin. (2) Chemical peel solutions cause the top layer of skin to peel off in order to hopefully smooth the surface of the skin and provide other benefits like fading fine lines and scars. Most chemical peels have a gel-like consistency and are applied to the face, though sometimes peels are used on other parts of the body, such as the neck, hands or chest.

Dr. Benchetrit uses techniques and technologies that produce minimal scarring and require little downtime. He is also one of a small group of surgeons in Canada to own the Vectra 3D photography system, which allows his patients to “preview” their results before making any decisions about surgery. Dr. Benchetrit closely consults with every surgical candidate to explore all available options and recommend a treatment plan suited to the person’s individual needs and goals.


The actual treatment with Chemical Peels involves applying the chemical evenly across the skin, whether it is the face or the hands or the neck portion. The affected person can either visit a clinic offering the treatment or buy the product of the clinic and use at home if you are familiar with the process. The person receiving the Chemical Peels treatment should know that once the chemical is applied, it will form blisters on the skin and after a while, it will peel off. But the first few moments, there would be a burning feeling but it will subside after some time. The person can feel a stinging feeling also. In such cases, a cold compress may have to be used to take care of this reaction.
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