In the term "plastic surgery," the adjective plastic implies sculpting and/or reshaping, which is derived from the Greek πλαστική (τέχνη), plastikē (tekhnē), "the art of modelling" of malleable flesh.[2] This meaning in English is seen as early as 1598.[3] The surgical definition of "plastic" first appeared in 1839, preceding the modern "engineering material made from petroleum" sense of plastic (coined by Leo Baekeland in 1909) by 70 years.[4]

After the procedure is done, the skin will look as though it has been sunburned, and for about a week after the procedure has been done, the skin will start to peel, exposing the skin underneath.  It can be a few weeks before the skin heals properly.  Medium-depth peels, however, may result in swelling or blisters that crust or break down over time and can take a longer time to heal.
A chemical peel is a cosmetic treatment (typically not covered by insurance) in which an esthetician or doctor applies a chemical solution to your skin, most often the skin on your face. After several hours or days, the solution blisters your skin’s top layer, allowing the damaged skin to peel away, revealing smoother skin underneath. Chemical peels are designed to reduce fine lines around the eyes and mouth, improve the appearance of acne scars, treat sun damage and age wrinkles, reduce age spots and other dark skin patches, and improve the overall look and feel of the skin.
Additionally, recent studies have found that certain chemical peels can help reverse melasma, a type of hyperpigmentary disorder and “notorious dermatosis” that is often resistant to treatments, including laser treatments. (8) Melasma is a common chronic form of hyperpigmentation of the skin that can have a serious impact on someone’s self-esteem and quality of life.

“Believe it or not, patients who are overweight are malnourished. What that means is that their capacity to heal is very poor,” says Grossman. “Patients who are malnourished have more seromas or fluid accumulations. In fact, about 50% of all patients will form a seroma when not stabilized nutritionally. So, at my practice we have an extensive approach to nutrition before and after the surgery.”


The most salient difference between chemical peels and microdermabrasion is that microdermabrasion is a non-chemical procedure, and attacks imperfections by actually "sanding" flaws from the skin surface. While treatment plans for microdermabrasion and mild chemical peels such as glycolic acid chemical peels are similar, more advanced chemical peels require only one session. However, deep chemical peels such as the phenol peel also require much more recovery time than microdermabrasion and the more mild peels. Also unlike microdermabrasion, deep chemical peels change the actual pigmentation of the skin through bleaching. Because of this, patients with naturally darker complexions may be better candidates for microdermabrasion.
This busy mom of 3 wanted to look less tired. She wanted to look like how she felt on the inside- happy and rested. She had the CO2 Smartxide laser treatment under her eyes to treat deep lines and wrinkles. She was also treated with Dysport (like Botox) and Princess Filler to treat lines and wrinkles around the eyes (tear troughs) and the lines around the mouth (nasolabial folds) with a full face rejuvenation technique. Dysport (like Botox) is a neuromodulator that is used to relax muscles and, therefore, is able to reduce wrinkles. This beautiful client also wanted to enhance her lips, but still look natural.
“Unwanted side effects are hyper or hypopigmentation, swelling, or infection,” says Dr. Davin Lim, a Brisbane, Queensland dermatologist, in a RealSelf Q&A. “Expected side effects are redness, flaking, and dryness, and can be easily managed. You can manage these risks by doing the following: sun protection, prepping your skin before chemical peels, avoiding active ingredients one to two days before treatment, and consulting with an experienced cosmetic provider and following aftercare instructions.”
There’s definitely no denying, the B word has definitely been a talking point of late, not just in the media, but within my close circle of friends too. Would you? Wouldn’t you? Have you? Has she? I promise it’s not as ‘Real Housewives of Cheshire’ as it sounds... But whilst I'm only 28, the reality is that the constant stream of late nights, binge drinking (sorry Mum) and falling asleep with a full face of makeup on, are all starting to show their effects.
The right chemical peel for you depends on your skin goals. For exfoliation and glowy skin, a light chemical peel is typically used. Medium peels are best for pigment irregularities, like age spots, and deep chemical peels can penetrate deep skin layers and combat fine wrinkles. Your provider can help you choose the right treatment option for your goals.

Though media and advertising do play a large role in influencing many people's lives, such as by making people believe plastic surgery to be an acceptable course to change our identities to our liking,[37] researchers believe that plastic surgery obsession is linked to psychological disorders like body dysmorphic disorder.[38] There exists a correlation between sufferers of BDD and the predilection toward cosmetic plastic surgery in order to correct a perceived defect in their appearance.[39]

This wonderful client wanted to look less tired and angry. She was treated with a full face rejuvenation technique, called Soft Lift, in one session. The Soft Lift combines the use of Botox and Juvederm filler to give her an overall refreshed and happier appearance. The 2nd photo was taken 1 week after her treatment to show that filler looks better with time. The 3rd photo was taken 1 month after the treatment. She loves her more fresher, youthful look!
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