Both standard and extended abdominoplasty often require that I place drainage tubes that help prevent the buildup of blood and fluid at the incision site. I will usually remove the first of these tubes after about three days, and the remainder are removed a few days later. I always provide a special support garment that can further prevent the buildup of fluid.
Additionally, recent studies have found that certain chemical peels can help reverse melasma, a type of hyperpigmentary disorder and “notorious dermatosis” that is often resistant to treatments, including laser treatments. (8) Melasma is a common chronic form of hyperpigmentation of the skin that can have a serious impact on someone’s self-esteem and quality of life.
Arm LiftBody ContouringBody LiftBotulinum ToxinBreast AugmentationBreast Implant Removal & ExchangeBreast LiftBreast ReconstructionBreast ReductionBrow LiftButtock Lift with AugmentationChin AugmentationCleft Lip and PalateDermal FillersEar SurgeryEyelid SurgeryFaceliftGynecomastia SurgeryHair TransplantLip AugmentationLiposuctionRhinoplastyThigh LiftTummy Tuck
Deep chemical peels involve a longer procedure and longer recovery time that lasts up to several months in some cases. Patients who want to correct blotches caused by sun exposure or age, minimize coarse wrinkles, or remove a pre-cancerous growth may benefit from a deep peel. There are certain factors which must be taken into consideration when contemplating a deep chemical peel. Darker-skinned patients and individuals with heart problems are not ideal candidates. Potential chemical peel candidates should be aware that the treatment may take an hour or more, and may require sedation. Anyone who decides on this procedure should be prepared for a long, slow recovery period, and should wear sunscreen whenever exposed to sun.
The best reaction came from my mum, who is always honest. She isn’t afraid to tell me I look tired, pale or spotty, but when I saw her after my treatment she couldn’t have been more complimentary. After confiding in her that I had botox she yelped and said, ‘Wow you did really need it, now you look so fresh, like you’ve had a month of great sleep’. Thanks mum.
Dr. Robert L. Shenker and Dr. Stephanie Ma are Royal College-certified specialists at The Cosmetic Surgery Clinic in Kitchener-Waterloo. The team of surgeons serves patients from Guelph, Cambridge, and London, Ontario, specializing in cosmetic and reconstructive breast surgery, surgical and non-surgical facial rejuvenation, and body contouring procedures.

You should expect to visit your surgeon the day after surgery to fully assess your condition. During this appointment, I usually fit the patient with their support garment, which will help to prevent the formation of blood clots. After the first follow-up, I schedule weekly visits. These continue depending upon the patient's extent of treatment, as well as his or her risk factors in developing blood clots and other complications.

"Personally, I think people need to mentally prepare themselves," she said. "You just had surgery, so of course your body will swell. You will be thinking, ‘Okay, I'm going to get a tummy tuck, and then I'm going to look amazing.' But that takes time. It's a process, and you need to be aware of that. You won't see an amazing new tummy after one or two days. It will be flat, but the swelling takes up to a year to finally subside."


Each peel is slightly different, and the exact formula will depend on the intensity level of the treatment. However, the most common chemicals used in peels are alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs), beta hydroxy acids (BHAs), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and phenol. AHAs and BHAs are the lightest acids, often used in light chemical peels. TCA can be used in many different formulations. Last but not least, phenol is the strongest chemical and only used in deep peels.
Dr. Robert L. Shenker and Dr. Stephanie Ma are Royal College-certified specialists at The Cosmetic Surgery Clinic in Kitchener-Waterloo. The team of surgeons serves patients from Guelph, Cambridge, and London, Ontario, specializing in cosmetic and reconstructive breast surgery, surgical and non-surgical facial rejuvenation, and body contouring procedures.
The average chemical peel can cost $500–$700 for each treatment, but prices range from $150 for a mild peel up to several thousand dollars for a series of deep peels. (10) While this might seem like a steep cost for good-looking skin, chemical peels are still less expensive than superficial fractional-laser treatments, which can run up to $1,000 a session and usually require multiple treatments.
The actual treatment with Chemical Peels involves applying the chemical evenly across the skin, whether it is the face or the hands or the neck portion. The affected person can either visit a clinic offering the treatment or buy the product of the clinic and use at home if you are familiar with the process. The person receiving the Chemical Peels treatment should know that once the chemical is applied, it will form blisters on the skin and after a while, it will peel off. But the first few moments, there would be a burning feeling but it will subside after some time. The person can feel a stinging feeling also. In such cases, a cold compress may have to be used to take care of this reaction.
The chemical solution for body chemical peels is typically comprised of a combination of trichloroacetic acid (the main ingredient in a medium-depth skin peel) and glycolic acid (the main ingredient of a mild peel). The solution for body chemical peels is typically formulated to be slightly stronger than the chemical solution used for light or medium facial skin peels, though it is milder than the phenol solution used for deep skin peels.
After your skin has been numbed, the solution is applied to your face and is left to ‘work’. The amount of time it’s left on your skin depends on the specific type of peel, and it could range from a few seconds to up to an hour for more lightweight peels. Some peels will be neutralized with water, and then a protective mask or layer of petroleum jelly is placed on your treated skin.
There are several factors that determine the cost of a chemical peel. The most significant difference in cost is related to the type of chemical peel that is being performed. Superficial peels such as those containing salicylic acid or glycolic acid are typically much cheaper than the stronger medium- and deep-depth chemical peels, like the TCA peel and the phenol-croton oil peel. These stronger peels are often performed under anesthesia, which contributes an added cost, and may take more time to perform and manage after the procedure is complete. However, the results of these stronger peels are usually permanent, whereas a more superficial peel may require several repeat treatments to achieve an adequate result. The severity of the skin issues to be treated, such as the deepness of the wrinkles or the amount of pigmentation changes, will be factors in determining which treatment is right for you. I recommend that you schedule a consultation with a board-certified physician who specializes in facial skin care and can evaluate your particular concerns to recommend the treatment that is most effective for you within your proposed budget. Remember, when it comes to your face, cost is a consideration, but the most important thing is that you find someone who will provide you with safe and effective treatment!
Deep peels must be performed by a medical doctor and can take 14 to 21 days to heal. Deep peels require special aftercare including antiviral medication, ointments and follow-up visits, according to the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. The chemical solution used for deep peels may be phenol or trichloroacetic acid, which both reach far into the middle layer of your skin and remove damaged skin cells. Phenol chemical peels may require sedation and should only be done on the face, as the skin on the hands and neck is too thin. The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery explains this procedure may only be performed one time on a patient and is not recommended for people with darker skin or freckles, as it can cause hypopigmentation. Deep peels may cost anywhere from $3,500-$5,000—not including the doctor’s fees. 

“Occasionally, patients will certainly engage in activities that slow their recovery or cause complications. Probably the most impactful factor is not following the surgeon’s instructions. This is a big one,” says Jack. “We make postoperative instructions for a reason — to protect the patient and help ensure they heal well and have a good cosmetic outcome.”
After a chemical peel, skin is temporarily more sensitive to the sun, so wear sunscreen every day. It should say "broad-spectrum" on the label, meaning it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB rays. Also, it should be a physical sunscreen and be above SPF 30. Limit your time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and wear a wide-brimmed hat.
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